The Making of a Field Marshall


IssueNet Edition| Date : 05 Jul , 2012

08 Jun 1969 to 15 Jan 1973

It was on New Year’s Day of 1973 that the nation got to know that the architect of India ’s greatest military victory in centuries had been elevated to the rank of field marshal. This came as a surprise to most of us. Only a couple of months earlier, the then defence minister had told the press at Chennai that India would not have a field marshal or a five-star general….. Click to continue reading

 

Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata’s 175th birth anniversary


Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata’s 175th birth anniversary : Click

Courtesy : K F Keravala

Parsi female drives in Cholistan rally


BAHAWALPUR: It started out with Tushna Patel being her husband’s navigator. But Roni Patel’s passion for car racing proved infectious and rubbed off on her too, eventually. This year, Tushna was the first female ever to participate in the 9th Cholistan Jeep Rally 2014.

This Parsi couple from Karachi enjoys the fast lane, literally. The couple has a 12-year-old son Meherwan and a 10-year-old daughter Dina.

Tushna, in an exclusive talk with The Express Tribune,  Click here to continue reading

 

Courtesy : Shirin Karanjia

Eminent Parsis of India


EMINENT PARSEES OF INDIA

               In science and industry

                 In academia

                Military

      In entertainment, religion, sports and astrology

      Politicians, activists and bureaucrats

  • B. P. Wadia (1881–1958), Indian theosophist and labour activist. Pioneered the creation of workers unions in India.
  • Cowasji Jehangir (Readymoney) (1812–1878): J.P.; introduced income tax in India; first baronet of Bombay.
  • Frene Ginwala (born 1932): Is a member of the ANC and aided Nelson Mandela in abolishing apartheid in South Africa. Later served for 7 years as Speaker Of the House of Parliament in South Africa
  • Jamshed Nusserwanjee Mehta (1886–1952): former Mayor of Karachi for 12 consecutive years.
  • Jamsheed Marker (born 1922): Pakistani diplomat, ambassador to more countries than any other person; recipient of Hilal-i Imtiaz.
  • Justice Dorab Patel (1924–1997): Former Chief Justice of Sindh High Court, former Justice of Supreme Court of Pakistan and human rights campaigner.
  • Mancherjee Bhownagree (1851–1933): politician, second Asian to be elected to the House of Commons (Conservative).
  • Minocher Bhandara (1937?–2008): Pakistani parliamentarian and owner of Muree Brewery.
  • Minoo Masani (1905–1998): author, parliamentarian and a member of the Constituent Assembly.
  • Piloo Mody (1926–1983): architect, parliamentarian, one of the founder-members of the Swatantra Party.
  • Rustam S. Sidhwa (1927–1997): judge on the Supreme Court of Pakistan as well as one of the original eleven judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
  • Shapurji Saklatvala (1874–1936): socialist, workers’ welfare activist, third Asian to be elected to the House of Commons (Communist, Labour).

          Indian Independence Movement

          Law

          Others

           In arts

Eminent Parsees Of India


  In science and industry

                 In academia

                Military

      In entertainment, religion, sports and                astrology

      Politicians, activists and bureaucrats

  • B. P. Wadia (1881–1958), Indian theosophist and labour activist. Pioneered the creation of workers unions in India.
  • Cowasji Jehangir (Readymoney) (1812–1878): J.P.; introduced income tax in India; first baronet of Bombay.
  • Frene Ginwala (born 1932): Is a member of the ANC and aided Nelson Mandela in abolishing apartheid in South Africa. Later served for 7 years as Speaker Of the House of Parliament in South Africa
  • Jamshed Nusserwanjee Mehta (1886–1952): former Mayor of Karachi for 12 consecutive years.
  • Jamsheed Marker (born 1922): Pakistani diplomat, ambassador to more countries than any other person; recipient of Hilal-i Imtiaz.
  • Justice Dorab Patel (1924–1997): Former Chief Justice of Sindh High Court, former Justice of Supreme Court of Pakistan and human rights campaigner.
  • Mancherjee Bhownagree (1851–1933): politician, second Asian to be elected to the House of Commons (Conservative).
  • Minocher Bhandara (1937?–2008): Pakistani parliamentarian and owner of Muree Brewery.
  • Minoo Masani (1905–1998): author, parliamentarian and a member of the Constituent Assembly.
  • Piloo Mody (1926–1983): architect, parliamentarian, one of the founder-members of the Swatantra Party.
  • Rustam S. Sidhwa (1927–1997): judge on the Supreme Court of Pakistan as well as one of the original eleven judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
  • Shapurji Saklatvala (1874–1936): socialist, workers’ welfare activist, third Asian to be elected to the House of Commons (Communist, Labour).

          Indian Independence Movement

          Law

          Others

           In arts

 

Courtesy : Soli Engineer

Ronnie Screwvala from arclights to farming


Ronnie Screwvala, creator of UTV Software Communications and, till recently, MD of Walt Disney India, says he has nothing to do with media or entertainment any more. As always, he wears a relaxed, casual air in his sprawling and tastefully done Breach Candy apartment in Mumbai. With the Arabian Sea stretching out to the horizon behind him, he begins to craft his words carefully and softly.
In February 2012, Screwvala walked away from UTV. The Walt Disney Co., which was already a majority partner with around 50.44 per cent of the firm, bought Screwvala and his associates’ 20 per cent stake for $454 million (then Rs 2,500 crore). He stayed on as MD of the merged Disney India for a while, and then anointed protégé Siddharth Roy Kapur as the new head in October last year. Now, he is literally ploughing a new furrow.
“I am amazed at the number of people who are amazed that I want to get out of Bollywood and media,” says Screwvala, his eyes twinkling. “Everyone wants to get in; and I want to get out.”

Click Here for more

The KENNEDY Center Honours…. A PARSI, A ZARATHUSHTI


Here is  a very  rare and brilliant ZARATHUSHI being honoured  by…. Well  you go ahead and see and hear it for yourself.   You would be  super-glad you did, even though you might have  seen it  before.

Improvising on what my friend JU said, I’d say,  “IT IS  A RARE JEWELLED FEATHER  IN THE Bharatiya Pravashi pagdi, fattoe or the Parsi caps…”

Please listen to the rich tribute the great violinist ITZAK PERLMAN bestows on this ZARATHUSHTI – ZUBIN MEHTA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9dn_2UPIKMY

Enjoy

Rusi Sorabji

Godrej family & Anu Aga honoured


Godrej family & Anu Aga honoured for their outstanding contribution towards the good of the society at Forbes India Philanthropy Awards.

Corporate Catalyst

Anu Aga

Why she won

For interpreting philanthropy as more than just signing a cheque and for getting personally involved in building philanthropic institutions.

 

 

 

 

Outstanding Corporate Foundation

Godrej family

Why they won

For consistently carrying out a wide range of philanthropic activities

http://forbesindia.com/awards/philanthropy/winners2013.html

 

Merwani Bomanji Casinath


 

Click here   to read an article about a genius Parsi musician, Merwani Bomanji Casinath who taught music to Zubin Mehta’s father.

Courtesy : Minocheher Damania.

The Wadias of India


The Parsis in India have had the tremendous good fortune of practicing their religion and customs generally without ostracism and persecution. This freedom has given them an opportunity to establish themselves in a country that not only refrained from proselytizing but also showed considerable tolerance towards all religions. Having been given this opportunity, they also had the encouragement of the British colonial rulers of India to develop their entrepreneurship skills and political savvy. The elevation in stature of the Parsis was undoubtedly one of the main causative factors in the small community’s escalating fortunes.

The recorded history of the Parsis of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries has shown them to have the inspiration to venture into uncharted waters with boldness, garnering their energies to establish a better life and advancement for their families, their community, and the countries of their origin and adoption – Iran and India. Their unique character could be attributed to three essential factors – their Irani-Zarathushti heritage, their Hindu-Indian socio-cultural adaptations, and their eager acceptance of Western (specifically) British educational and temporal values.  The Industrial Revolution was the backdrop against which the Parsis of the 18th, and 19th centuries proved their prowess in education and entrepreneurship, and continued the trend into the 20th century.

The ships they sailed on to reach India presented to the Parsis the bounties of the seas. At the height of the power under Achaemenian King Darius the Great, Zoroastrians mastered shipbuilding and learned much from the seafaring Phoenicians. The ability to build seafaring vessels eventually opened up the world of international trade. They founded many industries. By the time India achieved its independence in 1947, a mere 100,000 Parsis, in the subcontinent’s population of over half a billion people dominated major industries like the steel industry, the aviation industry, the textile industry, the movie industry, and the fields of medicine, science and law.

The Wadias, the Tatas, the Jeejeebhoys, and the Godrejs are among several families that have contributed in no small measure towards the industrial and economic advancement of their community and their country. One such family has for the last 250 years taken on the challenge of  industrial entrepreneurship with  great success and provided tremendous resources for their country’s well-being – that family is the Wadias.

Click here to continue reading the article : The Wadias of India

Courtesy : Dara

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 739 other followers