1001 Names of Pak Dadaar Hormuzd


We have all heard of 101 names of Pak Dadaar Ahuramazda.

Here is an old booklet which lists 1001 names of Pak Dadaar Ahuramazda. It is in Gujarati, and has meanings of the various names. The author is unknown and hence cannot give him / her due credit. If anyone knows of the author, please leave a comment. Will be grateful.

A very valuable find. Enjoy!

Click on this link to download the PDF e-book

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Arash the Archer


Arash the Archer (Erekhsho khshvivi-ishush – Tir Yasht para 6)

 

“Once when he (Afrasiyaab) attacked Iran, he was defeated by Minochehr. As the victor, Minochehr suggested to Afrasiyaab a way to demarcate the boundaries between Iran and Turan. In Iran, lived an archer named Eresh. He was considered the best archer in the whole of Iran and Turan. He was no ordinary mortal. He was in communion with Meher Yazad. It was decided that Eresh would shoot an arrow and the place where the arrow fell would become the boundary between the warring countries. Afrasiyaab readily agreed to this condition. On the appointed day, Eresh climbed Mount Demavand early morning, and with the power of Maanthravani, shot an arrow. It was afternoon when the arrow fell at a certain spot near the river Vohun. This became the new boundary between Iran and Turan.” (1)

(1) : Iran Ni Tavarikh (16) – Lecture series by Late Adi Doctor Saheb that was chronicled by Hanoz Mistry. The article appeared in Dini Avaz Vol. 23 No. 2.

 

The basic story of the bowman runs as follows: In a war between the Iranians and Turanians over the “royal glory” (khwarrah), the General Afrasiab has surrounded the forces of the righteous Manuchehr, and the two sides agree to make peace. Both reach an agreement that whatever land falls within the range of a bow-shot shall be returned to the Manuchehr and the Iranians, and the rest should then fall to Afrasiab and the Aniranians. An angel (in al-Biruni it is ‘Esfandaramad’, i.e. the Amesha Spenta Spenta Armaiti, in Middle Persian called ‘Spendarmad’) instructs Manuchehr to construct a special bow and arrow, and Arash is asked to be the archer. Arash then fires the specially-prepared arrow at dawn, which then traveled a great distance (see below) before finally landing and so marking the future border between the Iranians and the Aniranians.

 

In Talebi and Bal’ami, Arash is destroyed by the shot and disappears. In al-Tabari, he is exalted by the people, is appointed commander of the archers and lives out his life in great honor. The distance the arrow travels varies: in one it is thousand leagues (farsakhs), in another forty days walk. In several, the arrow traveled from dawn to noon, in others from dawn until sunset. A few sources specify a particular date for the event. The Middle Persian Mah i Frawardin notes the 6th day of the 1st month (i.e. Khordad of Frawardin); later sources associate the event with the name-day festivities of Tiregan (13th of Tir) “presumably” provoked by the homonymity with the Yazata Tir or tir “arrow.” (Tafażżolī 1987, p. 266)

 

The location from which Arash fired his arrow varies as well. In the Avesta (which does not mention places in Western Iran), it is Airyo.khshaotha, a not-further identified location in the Middle Clime. Islamic-era sources typically place the location of the shot somewhere just south of the Caspian Sea, variously in Tabaristan (Tabari, Talebi, Maqdesi, ibn al-Athir, Marashi); a mountain-top in Ruyan (al-Biruni, Gardēzī), Amul fortress (Mojmal), Mount Damavand (Balami) or Sari (Gorgani). The place the arrow landed is variously identified as ‘Mount Khvanvant’ in the Avesta (likewise an unknown location); a river in Balkh (Tabari, al-Atir); east of Balkh (Talebi); Bactria/Tokharistan (Maqdesi, Gardizi); the banks of the Oxus River (Balami) or Merv (Mojmal). According to al-Biruni, it hit a nut tree between “Fargana” and Tabaristan “in the furthest reaches of [Greater] Khorasan.”

 

The name Arash remains one of the most popular names among Iranians.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arash

http://www.cais-soas.com/CAIS/Mythology/arash.htm

 

Courtesy: Jimmy Tavadia

DOLLY DASTOOR ELECTED AS TRUSTEE TO THE BOARD OF THE PARLIAMENT OF WORLD’S RELIGIONS


FEZANA is proud to announce that our own Dolly Dastoor has been elected as a Trustee to sit on the Board of the Parliament of World’s Religions. This was announced in a recent communiqué by the Parliament of World’s Religions. She will be the only Zoroastrian on the Board. The trustees are elected for their work in the professional and interfaith field and not necessarily to represent their faith, but more importantly to think globally.

Dollyportraitm2_thumbDolly has been a leading light in the Zoroastrian Community in North America and all over the world. As past President of the Zoroastrian Association of Quebec, and later as the Past-President of FEZANA (Federation of Zoroastrian Associations of North America) she has been a leader in the community for decades. Her current involvements include being the Chair of the Academic Scholarship Committee of FEZANA and as the Chief Editor of the FEZANA Journal, the flagship publication of FEZANA. The upcoming FEZANA Journal Summer 2016 issue will incidentally be Dolly’s 10th Anniversary issue as its Chief Editor.

Dolly was part of FEZANA’s contingent to the last Parliament of World’s Religions in Salt Lake City, Utah in October 2015.

Besides her community involvement, Dolly is a widely published research clinical psychologist and an authority on psychogeriatrics, most recently at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montreal. She received her doctorate from Concordia University. Before coming to Canada, she was a Senior Research Fellow in Psychiatry and coordinator of the World Health Organization (WHO) Project on Schizophrenia at the University of Ibadan. She has been active in women’s organizations, especially ZONTA International.

About the Parliament of World’s Religions.

The Parliament of the World’s Religions seeks to promote interreligious harmony, rather than unity. The problem with seeking unity among religions is the risk of loss of the unique and precious character of each individual religious and spiritual tradition; this understanding is key to our framework.

Interreligious harmony, on the other hand, is an attainable and highly desirable goal. Such an approach respects, and is enriched by, the particularities of each tradition. Moreover, within each tradition are the resources (philosophical, theological and spiritual teachings and perspectives) that enable each to enter into respectful, appreciative and cooperative relationships with persons and communities of other traditions.

Courtesy : FEZANA

ELMHURST COLLEGE TO HOST BIENNIAL ZOROASTRIAN GAMES


From June 30 to July 4, members of the international Zoroastrian community will be arriving in Elmhurst to participate in a long weekend of competitive sports.

According to the Zoroastrian Sports Committee website, Zoroastrianism is a religion that was founded circa 1500 BC. It is one of the oldest monotheist religions known.

In 1988, a group of Zoroastrians, also known as Zarathustis, decided to hold the first Z Games in Los Angeles. The idea was to gather members of the community from the United States, Canada, India, Iran and other countries around the world to promote unity and friendly competition.

The games are held July 4 every other year. The last games took place in 2014 in Los Angeles.

The Zoroastrian Games, besides encouraging participants to lead healthier lives by making exercise part of their routines, allow people from all over the world who share the same belief system to meet each other and form long-lasting friendships.

The games are open to adults 16 and older and children from 7 to 15 years old.

Adults can participate in team sports including basketball and volleyball, as well as individual sports including tennis, table tennis, track, swimming and golf. There are also team relay events for swimming and track.

Children can participate in basketball, track and swimming.

Housing for the 2016 Zoroastrian Games will be in Stanger Hall at Elmhurst College, which will allow athletes to stay close to where the games will take place.

There also will be three activities for people to socialize and enjoy time off from competing. The weekend of fun will kick off July 1 at the Mediterranean restaurant Reza’s, 40 N. Tower Road.

There will be a tour July 2 that will include attractions in Chicago as well as local Zarathusti landmarks.

The weekend ends with the Red Carpet Banquet, an evening of dining and dancing to celebrate the games.

http://www.mysuburbanlife.com/2016/06/22/elmhurst-college-to-host-biennial-zoroastrian-games/agnicm6/

THE STORY OF AN ICONIC INDIAN FAMILY PHOTOGRAPH


Evenings at Cozy Building
Image captionEvenings at Cozy Building, Bombay, 1982

Indian writer and photographer Sooni Taraporevala, best known as the screenwriter of The Namesake and Oscar-nominated Salaam Bombay, took a picture of her family in a Mumbai balcony 31 years ago. Shown in exhibitions and featured in a book, this has been an iconic picture of an Indian – and Parsi – family.

After the recent death of the last surviving family member featured in the picture, Taraporevala relates the story behind it.

Though this was a typical daily scene in my family, I have only one frame to remember it by.

It was 1982. I was a graduate film student at New York University. Somehow I had cobbled together the price of an airline ticket and had come home to Bombay (much later renamed Mumbai) and Cozy Building.

Built in 1921, Cozy Building is one of four Parsi buildings near Gowalia Tank – a park in central Mumbai – that flank a lane, with a fire temple at the end of it.

My grandparents moved into the building the year it was built and where I grew up in an extended family – my parents Freny and Rumi, my paternal grandparents Aloo and Aderji and my father’s two unmarried brothers, Kersi and Adi.

It was from Gowalia Tank that Mahatma Gandhi started the Quit India movementin 1942. The older generation had ringside seats.

Perfect tableau

I was about to quit India myself, reluctantly. It was the evening before I was to fly back to America. My best friend Rashida was visiting with her two-year-old son Murtaza.

I was on the balcony with him – he was in my chair eating wafers and I was taking his photo when I turned and saw my family in this perfect tableau.

My grand-uncle Maneck is reading the comics page of a newspaper. My father’s brother Kersi is looking out. My mother’s sister Piloo is visiting my grandfather Aderji, his eyes shut.

I took a single picture; I don’t know why I didn’t take more.

I flew off consumed by homesickness and an unwillingness to leave. It was the last time I would ever see my beloved Maneck. He passed away shortly after.

The watch he’s wearing in the photo – I wear it now. It works fine even 34 years later.

My grandmother, Bombay, 1980
Image captionMy grandmother, Aloo Taraporevala, Bombay, 1980

Maneck was single – never married – lived with his sister, also single, a brisk 20-minute walk away.

He came to our house every day, rain or shine, walking from his home at Sleater Road at five in the evening. He would depart three hours later. He never varied his routine, even though as a child I tried my hardest to make him.

Charming

This photo captures Aderji perfectly, his eyes closed, trying to shut out the world. A good-hearted curmudgeon, he had no social niceties and told it like it was much to my grandmother’s embarrassment.

My grandmother was on the other end of the spectrum – charming, outgoing, fun loving, loved by all.

She is not in the frame but was probably on the balcony, off camera, telling her brother-in-law, “Have you come here to talk or to read the newspaper?”

Cozy Building
Image captionMy mother Freny and father Rumi at Cozy Building, 2016

My mother’s sister Piloo, with elegant long feet, was visiting, probably to say goodbye.

Her mouth is open, she’s saying something, but nobody seems to be listening.

Maybe Kersi has heard, there’s a slight smile on his face.

My quiet, self-effacing uncle, who used to laugh, embarrassed, yet tickled, when I’d inform him that people who saw this photo said he looked like Elvis Presley.

He was very sporting about his niece taking him around the world in his sudra – the muslin undergarment Parsis are required to wear.

A foodie who had eaten in every Mumbai restaurant, as he put it, from Nariman Point to Mahim, Kersi was crazy about cricket – it was his all-consuming passion.

He had nothing but scorn for the spoilt state of today’s Indian cricketers. His uncle Khurshed Mehehomji had been the wicket keeper in the Indian team that played in England in 1936.

He knew how his uncle got nothing except the clothes on his back and the saafa (turban) on his head, unlike the cricketers now.

Singular underdog

Kersi hated the ads on television, thought Americans were nuts and Donald Trump the nuttiest of them all. He was happiest in his room in his own world of music that he loved from the past, cricket matches on TV and Hollywood movies of his youth.

Family
Image captionMy mother and my son, Jahan, Cozy Building, 2016
Family
Image captionMy daughter Iyanah, Cozy Building, 2016

My sweet, gentle uncle Kersi breathed his last on the same balcony on 12 June.

Though everybody from the photo has gone now, I know that they are still around; I have felt their presence in my life, and their love, countless times.

I know they watch over my mum and dad as they read the evening papers, my uncle Adi, my husband Firdaus, our children Jahan and Iyanah.

Evenings on our Cozy Building balcony continue.

My dad tells us how in the old days, the hills of Matheran were visible in the distance.

That’s hard to imagine. Now all we see are tall monstrosities, empty, unlived, mushrooming all around us in a frenzy of greedy, unplanned, development.

My screenwriter’s imagination foresees a future where like in the movie Up, Cozy Building might become increasingly hemmed in by monster buildings, the brave singular underdog, still holding out.

All pictures by Sooni Taraporevala

This post first appeared at http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-36583511

Xerxes Desai, founder of Titan


Xerxes Desai, founder of Titan, dies

Desai played a key role in introducing India to its first quartz watch in the late 80s when he set up Titan.

Xerxes Desai spent four decades working across the Tata Group. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint

Xerxes Desai spent four decades working across the Tata Group. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint

Bengaluru: Xerxes Sapur Desai, the man who founded Titan Co. Ltd and made it an internationally renowned Indian watch brand, is no more.

The 79-year-old died in Bengaluru on Monday because of acute gastroenteritis.

“He was not only our founder, but also our greatest advocate. Over the years, his guidance and dogged pursuit of perfection helped make Titan a household name and a market leader,” the company said in an e-mailed statement.

“He was big thinking, iconoclastic, meticulous, insightful, humanitarian with a enhanced sense of style and taste, articulate and quality conscious. A passionate rationalist who believed that ‘Yesterday’s truths are today’s heresies,’” said Bhaskar Bhat, Managing director, Titan.

A graduate of Bombay and Oxford Universities, Desai played a key role in introducing India to its first quartz watch in the late 80s when he set up Titan Co. Ltd (part of Tata Sons), after enduring years of resistance from state-owned and now defunct HMT Watches.

But that is not his only contribution to the world, those who knew him pointed out.

Desai was an “amazing, eclectic entrepreneur,” and “a passionate fighter for Indian cities,” said Titan board member and urban development expert Ireena Vittal, who praised his “inspirational design sensibility that helped lay down the foundation for Titan and earlier Taj.”

Like many others, Vittal called him a fine gentleman with lovely stories and great dogs. Desai, who loved western classical and jazz, often brought his two dogs to work.

“I will so miss him,” Vittal said in an e-mail.

Infosys co-founder N.R. Narayana Murthy shared the sentiment.

“He was a wonderful person and the city will miss him,” said Murthy, who met him on many occasions over the years. “He was a perfectionist, a disciplined man and always on time.” Murthy fondly remembered the time when Infosys distributed custom-designed watches to 25,000 employees when it celebrated its “Billion Dollar Day.”

Desai’s journey in building one of the largest indigenous brands in the country was not an easy one. While the idea of Titan came about in 1979, it took him seven long years to finally set up a factory in Hosur, on the outskirts of Bengaluru, in 1986 with support from the Tamil Nadu government.

“It was a time,” Desai recalled of days in the 60s in an earlier interview with Mint, “when one had to write an application to HMT to get a watch you see. One couldn’t buy it in the open market. You then got a letter of approval from the department and then over a couple of weeks you had to go to a store to collect it.”

Before Titan, Desai spent four decades working across the Tata Group—TAS, Tata Press, Taj Hotels—fighting odds and making a case for businesses to flourish in a closed economy.

Varun Sood and Sharan Poovanna contributed to this story.

Dr. Peshotan Dastur Hormazdyar Mirza (High Priest of Iranshah Atashbehram at Udvada)


Dr. Peshotan Dastur Hormazdyar Mirza is fantastic combination of religious fervour and technical excellence. Born at Udvada in November 1944, Dr. Peshotan Mirza acquired his priestly Education and Training at:

Seth Sorabji Manekji Damanwala Madressa, Udvada.
The M.F. Cama Athornan Institute, Andheri.
Ordained the Zoroastrian Priestly orders of Navar, Maratab and Samel; performed higher liturgical services and ‘Boi’ ceremony of Holy Iranshah

Atash-Behram, Udvada. As for his academic and theological education; he passed SSC examination and joined St. Xavier’s college Mumbai and obtained B.Sc (Honors), M.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry from the University of Bombay.

He studied Avesta-Pahlavi and Iranian History at Sir J.J Zarthosti Madressa and Mulla Firoze Madressa, Mumbai alongside University studies in Science.

He was appointed to the exalted position of Dastur (High-Priest) of Iranshah Atash Behram; Samast Anjuman, Udvada on 13th May 2004.

Apart from being a priest of the highest calibre, few in the community know that he was a lecturer in Chemistry at St. Xavier’s College; Mumbai Development and Documentation Scientist at International Draxon Industries, Tehran, Iran.

Retired from the post of General Manager – Technical Services in a Chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

Former member -Science and Technology Sub-committee, Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

Member – Research Committee – The K.R. Cama Oriental Institute, Mumbai

Member of Managing Committee – M.F. Cama Athornan Institute and its ex-student Association.

Trustee – Athornan Mandal and Udvada Anjuman.

Besides discharging religious duties as a high priest of Iranshah Atash Behram Udvada Anjuman, he is also presently working as a technical advisor in a chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

He has attended and participated in religious and technical seminars and conferences. He was an invitee to the world conference on spiritual regeneration and human values at Bangalore in January 2003, and addressed the gathering there on Spirituality and science. He also attended a conference of world religions dialogue and symphony at Mahuva, Bhavnagar in 2009.

A great orator, he has lectured on Zoroastrian religious and historical subjects at various places of Parsi settlements in India, Singapore, Dubai, Karachi and Iran.

Dr. Peshotan Mirza is a shining jewel of our community. A man of not only great virtue, sincerity and spirituality, but also of technical excellence. May his tribe increase with the divine benedictory of Pak Iranshah Atashbehram, our prophet Zarathushta and Pak Dadar Ahura Mazda. Atha Jamyat Yathra Afrinami!

Message to the Parsi/ Irani Zarthostis
Religion is the Divine Law of life revealed by the Prophet. It is the divinely inspired knowledge about the creator, spiritual beings and about the life in this world and life here after. It teaches us our duties, responsibilities, commitments towards our creator, ourselves and others.

Religion plays an important part in our daily life. If properly interpreted, understood and practiced, religion guides our destiny and moulds our character. It inculcates spirituality in the worldly life and leads us on the path of piety, virtue and thus inspires us to do good deeds of benevolence. In distress, it gives solace and comfort; in difficulty and danger it affords courage and fortitude.

There can be no worldly life without difficulties and problems. In their long and chequered history, our fore-fathers had to face innumerable difficulties, problems and hardships. Yet, they remained deeply rooted in their ethnicity and religious teachings, customs and traditions. By sheer dint of their faith in Religion, Prophet Zarathustra and Almighty Lord Ahura Mazda, they trounced the difficulties, maintained their religious identity and flourished practically in all walks of life in spite of their small number. They spent their life with hard work, high standard of integrity, spirit of enterprise and service, noble qualities of benevolence and philanthropy.

Zoroastrian Religion enjoins daily prayers and rituals along with moral, ethical virtues of life with purity of mind body and soul. This is the Zoroastrian Path of life in accordance with Humata Hukhta Huvarshta – Good Thoughts, Good Words and Good Deeds.

With these noble qualities they maintained religious identity and at the same time became friends to all India and contributed handsomely in development of our country.

In the present day it becomes our religious duty to emulate our forefathers. It becomes our religious duty that Parsis work hard and flourish in their chosen fields; marry within the fold at the right age and expand their family to the right size. The Parsis must maintain their religious identity and at the same time treat the members of the other communities with respect, justice, harmony and friendship just as our fore fathers did. This is the religious duty and responsibility of every member of our community.

May Lord Ahura Mazda shower his divine blessings upon, eyery member of the Parsi/Irani Zarthosti community in particular and humanity at large!

Courtesy: Fereydoun Rasti

ODE TO VADA DASTURJI PESHOTAN MIRZA


 


May his sweet soul rest

In eternal peace

He is now free of

Misery & disease

He is now in
Ahura Mazda’s care

Surrounded by His

Madens fair

He was a simple

Very  learned soul

If he would have lived
A little longer bridged

The Community &

Made it whole

But alas! now that

He is gone

His teachings as well as

His wordly advice

Will forever linger on

 

Your sorrows are

Our sorrows

Our hearts truly bleeds

Our efficacious prayers

Are there for you when

You are in need

May Ahura Mazda

Keep & protect you

Wrap His arm around you

May Dasturji’s sweet soul

Be there to guide you

faridabam@gmail.com

26th of June 2016

Tributes to Dasturji Peshotan Mirza


Vada Dasturji Dr. Peshotan Mirza passed away today after a tenacious battle with cancer. The entire Parsi community mourns the loss of this splendid and erudite Zoroastrian – one of our finest Vada Dasturjis.

Till the end he served the community with integrity, scholarship and commitment.

May his glorious soul find Garothman Behest – and may his family find solace in their hour of grief.

 

Courtesy :‎Yezdi Maneck Bhathena‎

*******‎

 

 

 

Traditional Zarthustis have lost a great personality [on 26-06-2016]. An ideal HEAD Priest. A very humble and low profile soul. My sincere prayers for his Ruvan to proceed towards Garothman Behest in Sarosh Yazad ni Panah.

Courtesy : ‎Godrej Sachinwalla

******* 

A pic that speaks a thousand words…cud not help sharing.

May the divine soul of Dasturji Peshotan Mirza attain the highest heaven – Garothman Behesht.

Courtesy : ‎Jasmine Sahukar


Dr. Peshotan Dastur Hormazdyar Mirza is fantastic combination of religious fervour and technical excellence. Born at Udvada in November 1944, Dr. Peshotan Mirza acquired his priestly Education and Training at:

Seth Sorabji Manekji Damanwala Madressa, Udvada.

The M.F. Cama Athornan Institute, Andheri.

Ordained the Zoroastrian Priestly orders of Navar, Maratab and Samel; performed higher liturgical services and ‘Boi’ ceremony of Holy Iranshah Atash-Behram, Udvada. As for his academic and theological education; he passed SSC examination and joined St. Xavier’s college Mumbai and obtained B.Sc (Honors), M.Sc and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry from the University of Bombay.

He studied Avesta-Pahlavi and Iranian History at Sir J.J Zarthosti Madressa and Mulla Firoze Madressa, Mumbai alongside University studies in Science.

He was appointed to the exalted position of Dastur (High-Priest) of Iranshah Atash Behram; Samast Anjuman, Udvada on 13th May 2004.

Apart from being a priest of the highest calibre, few in the community know that he was a lecturer in Chemistry at St. Xavier’s College; Mumbai Development and Documentation Scientist at International Draxon Industries, Tehran, Iran.

Retired from the post of General Manager – Technical Services in a Chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

Former member -Science and Technology Sub-committee, Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

Member – Research Committee – The K.R. Cama Oriental Institute, Mumbai

Member of Managing Committee – M.F. Cama Athornan Institute and its ex-student Association.

Trustee – Athornan Mandal and Udvada Anjuman.

Besides discharging religious duties as a high priest of Iranshah Atash Behram Udvada Anjuman, he is also presently working as a technical advisor in a chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

He has attended and participated in religious and technical seminars and conferences. He was an invitee to the world conference on spiritual regeneration and human values at Bangalore in January 2003, and addressed the gathering there on Spirituality and science. He also attended a conference of world religions dialogue and symphony at Mahuva, Bhavnagar in 2009.

A great orator, he has lectured on Zoroastrian religious and historical subjects at various places of Parsi settlements in India, Singapore, Dubai, Karachi and Iran.

Dr. Peshotan Mirza is a shining jewel of our community. A man of not only great virtue, sincerity and spirituality, but also of technical excellence. May his tribe increase with the divine benedictory of Pak Iranshah Atashbehram, our prophet Zarathushta and Pak Dadar Ahura Mazda. Atha Jamyat Yathra Afrinami! He studied Avesta-Pahlavi and Iranian History at Sir J.J Zarthosti Madressa and Mulla Firoze Madressa, Mumbai alongside University studies in Science.

He was appointed to the exalted position of Dastur (High-Priest) of Iranshah Atash Behram; Samast Anjuman, Udvada on 13th May 2004.

Apart from being a priest of the highest calibre, few in the community know that he was a lecturer in Chemistry at St. Xavier’s College; Mumbai Development and Documentation Scientist at International Draxon Industries, Tehran, Iran.

Retired from the post of General Manager – Technical Services in a Chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

Former member -Science and Technology Sub-committee, Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

Member – Research Committee – The K.R. Cama Oriental Institute, Mumbai

Member of Managing Committee – M.F. Cama Athornan Institute and its ex-student Association.

Trustee – Athornan Mandal and Udvada Anjuman.

Besides discharging religious duties as a high priest of Iranshah Atash Behram Udvada Anjuman, he is also presently working as a technical advisor in a chemical manufacturing company in Mumbai.

He has attended and participated in religious and technical seminars and conferences. He was an invitee to the world conference on spiritual regeneration and human values at Bangalore in January 2003, and addressed the gathering there on Spirituality and science. He also attended a conference of world religions dialogue and symphony at Mahuva, Bhavnagar in 2009.

A great orator, he has lectured on Zoroastrian religious and historical subjects at various places of Parsi settlements in India, Singapore, Dubai, Karachi and Iran.

Dr. Peshotan Mirza is a shining jewel of our community. A man of not only great virtue, sincerity and spirituality, but also of technical excellence. May his tribe increase with the divine benedictory of Pak Iranshah Atashbehram, our prophet Zarathushta and Pak Dadar Ahura Mazda. Atha Jamyat Yathra Afrinami!

 

Courtesy : Khushru Variava

MINISTRY OF MINORITY AFFAIRS PLANS PROJECTS TO STUDY AVESTAN AND VEDIC SANSKRIT


As per the proposal,  the sacred language of Zoroastrians with close links to Vedic Sanskrit will be studied and researched from ancient times to know the confluence of both traditions

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 Several new chapters in the history of Vedic literature may unfurl in the near future as the Ministry of Minority Affairs is mulling over a project that will study the links between Avestan and Vedic Sanskrit.CONFLUENCE AVESTAN AND VEDIC SANSKRIT

Termed as National project on Avestan Studies, the proposal is currently under consideration with the ministry. As per the proposal, Avestan, the sacred language of Zoroastrians with close links to Vedic Sanskrit, will be studied and researched from ancient times to know the confluence of both traditions.

The project aims to preserve, conserve and develop the Zoroastrian tradition of Avestan studies that will be majorly taken up by Delhi University. The government is planning to set up an advisory committee on the project consisting of two eminent individuals belonging to the Zoroastrian community and the vice-chancellor of Delhi University as the chairperson of the committee.

“We will be studying the links between both the cultures as they are believed to be similar. We may get to know several new things about Vedic Sanskrit. We will collaborate with other institutes and centres all over the country as well as abroad to conduct joint activities for any of the objectives of the project; to identify and give special attention to senior scholars and institutes working in the areas which are on the brink of extinction for want of patronage,” said Prof Ramesh C Bhardwaj, director of the National project on Avestan Studies. Bhardwaj is also head, Department of Sanskrit at DU.

The areas studied will be modern scientific temper contained in both the traditions, especially in the disciplines of comparative religion, mythology, epigraphy, palaeography, astronomy, meteorology, environment science linguistics and history.

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