Search Results for: Fravahar

Fravahar Island in the Persian Gulf

The plan for building an artificial island in the shape of fravahar in the Persian Gulf is under completion .The agreed confirmation for this project has also been issued. This island is being built on a 6 million and two hundred thousand  square meter land measuring 3×5 km.This island is located in front of the outskirts of the historical Siraf Harbour in the Bushehr province. This island includes Boarding and lodging sites,Hotels,University, Solar Energy Center ,Playground,A big cultural International Hall for cultural speech and conversations etc….


Dr.Esfandiyar Ekhtiyari(The Iranian Zoroastrians MP) being the managerial member of this team informed us that in the near future  the plan for this project which is being supervised by 60 executives will be executed after final analysis.This project being unique in its own kind will be displaying something of its own kind to the generations to come.

This artificial island will be  built in the Southern part of pars locality in the outskirts of the historical harbour of Siraf. Siraf being one of the oldest cities of the Bushehr province.Once this harbour was the host to big ships that arrived from main Iranian and MiddleEast harbours but due to earthquake and Tsunami in the spring of the year 398 Ghamari most of this harbour was destroyed and now the only remains show the Siraf Jame Mosque, the Nasuri Fort, Dakhme( The Zoroastrian Cemetary),and a market.
fravahar
As per Iranian belief Fravahar is the part of every being and that it is with fravahar that we can enlighten our path towards development and that best light. Different parts of Fravahar have been explained as Follows

The Faravahar or Farohar is the spirit of human being that had been existed before his/her birth and will continue to exist after his/her death. It is to remind one of the purpose of life on this Earth, which is to live in such a way that the soul progresses spiritually and attains union with Ahura-Mazda (the Wise Lord); this state is called Frasho-kereti in Avesta.

The Fravahar’s face resembles the face of human being and therefore, indicates its connection to mankind. There are two wings which have three main feathers. These main feathers indicate three symbols of ‘good reflection,’ ‘good words,’ and ‘good deed,’ which are at the same time the motive of flight and advancement. The lower part of the Fravahar consists of three parts, representing ‘bad reflection,’ ‘bad words,’ and ‘bad deed’ which causes misery and misfortune for human beings.

There are two loops at the two sides of the Fravahar, which represent Sepanta Minu, and Angra Minu. The former is directed toward the face and the latter is located at the back. This also indicates that we have to proceed toward the good and turn away from bad. The circle in the middle of the Fravahar’s trunk indicates that our spirit is immortal, having neither a beginning nor an end.

One hand of the Fravahar points upwards, showing that we have to struggle to thrive. The other hand holds a ring. Some interpreters consider that as the ring of covenant, representing loyalty and faithfulness which is the basis of Zarathustra’s philosophy.

BEHROOZ KHALILI

Protect Our Heritage

Friends,

As reported in Iran’s Amordad News of September 3, 2016 and an incident captured in a video, there has been an incident of defacement of a Fravahar symbol by a mullah in a from the wall of the Town Hall in the city of YAZD.  Iranian Zarathushtis (Zoroastrians) are collecting at least 10,000 signatures on their on-line petition to be submitted to the Iranian government to stop this kind of action.  I was informed about this by an Iranian Zarathushti who is in contact with fellow Zarathushtis in Iran.

Please visit  www.protectourheritage.co   to see the on-line petition and add your name on it.

The government of Iran is sympathetic to it, and would like the request to come from Zoroastrians.
With the president of Iran in New York, we need to collect  as many signatures as possible and I urge you to do so personally  and disseminate to your network

I have signed the petition.   Please visit the website and check it out for  yourself

Please forward this to your family and friends after you have signed it.

Regards,

Maneck Bhujwala

Fravahar Island in the Persian Gulf.

BEHROOZ KHALILI
The plan for building an artificial island in the shape of fravahar in the Persian Gulf is under completion .The agreed confirmation for this project has also been issued. This island is being built on a 6 million and two hundred thousand  square meter land measuring 3×5 km.This island is located in front of the outskirts of the historical Siraf Harbour in the Bushehr province. This island includes Boarding and lodging sites,Hotels,University, Solar Energy Center ,Playground,A big cultural International Hall for cultural speech and conversations etc….

Dr.Esfandiyar Ekhtiyari(The Iranian Zoroastrians MP) being the managerial member of this team informed us that in the near future  the plan for this project which is being supervised by 60 executives will be executed after final analysis.This project being unique in its own kind will be displaying something of its own kind to the generations to come.

Click here for more

 

Courtesy : Zaver Bomanbehram

 

Organ Donation Debate

Whose Body is it anyway! – Noshir H. Dadrawala

Parsis thrive on controversy and debates; sometime I think that’s what keeps us alive. If we are not debating on whether to consign our dead to the dakhma or the crematorium, we would be debating on whether we should be eating at least fish and eggs during Bahman Mah. There are also milder debates on reincarnation and whether the head on the fravahar symbol should face left or right or whether we should sit or stand during the boi ceremony? Oh we just love to argue!

Now the latest ‘seasonal’ debate is over ‘organ donations’.

I read Ervadsaheb Marzban Hathiram’s article published in the Jam-e-Jamshed with interest.

Ervadsaheb states: “charity can be done only with that which is ours, not that which belongs to someone else. …. The moot question is this – is the human body ours or does it belong to the All mighty?”

My moot response would be; does anything really belong to us? Theologically, everything belongs to God. So if this argument is to be taken seriously even our wealth (or our knowledge) does not belong to us and therefore if God has blessed us with wealth or knowledge, we should keep it only to ourselves.

According to esoteric theories the visually impaired are challenged due to some “karmic” debt. However, in like manner some are poor, hungry and roofless, also due to “karmic” debt. And, therefore by this logic, Jejeeboy, Petit, Tata, Godrej and the Wadia families should all have kept their God given wealth to themselves and let the poor and roofless endure their “karmic” fate! Who are we to lessen the burden of those who suffer due to their past or present karma? By being charitable are we not putting a spoke in the karmic wheel of Divine Retribution?

Ervadsaheb also feels that “real charity means giving away something even though we may need it”. I agree with that. But just as we give of our wealth when alive and also leave much of our estate after we depart in our will, we could contribute blood or plasma while alive to save lives and organs when we are no more! Charity can be done as much during life as after death.

Ervadsaheb says, “It is a well-known fact that in case any part of the human body is amputed or severed it is never thrown away but is always consigned to the Dakhma, after performing the GehSarna ritual.” Well, I had my tonsils removed when I was a child, but, I am not sure what the doctors did with that. An uncle had his gall bladder and appendix removed. I am not sure if the priests would have done a GehSarna ritual over it and then consign it to the dakhma?

There is high incidence of breast and ovarian cancer among Parsi women and prostrate and testicular cancers among Parsi men. I can’t think of priests performing ceremonies over these body parts and consigning them to the dokhma.

If one goes strictly by the scriptures, the Dakhma should be situated far away from where people live. But do we follow that? No, in fact we built a Parsi colony where there was once a jungle! According to esoteric Zoroastrianism the body should be fully disposed by the fourth day and the ‘anasaar’ (‘spiritual components’) handed over to Daham Yazata. But, it is a fact that today the bodies take months to decompose. Would you rather have a crow or a kite peck out your loved one’s eyes or a surgeon gracefully taking out the cornea and put light in someone else’s eye and life.

I have a dear Parsi friend (now 80 years young) who lost vision in one eye 37 years ago. From a super active and creative Bank executive he suddenly became a helpless and dependent individual. 17 years later he lost vision in the other eye. To his good fortune and thanks to a donor, he underwent surgery and his life not only returned to normalcy but he began to do a lot of social work. Thanks to him more than a thousand Parsis have visited Iran over the last two decades. Think about it; should he have accepted blindness as karmic retribution or undergone surgery and make a difference in this world with the gift of sight? Thanks to this experience, several members of his family (including his mother and wife) have already donated their eyes after death.

The Zoroastrian scriptures are silent on the subject of organ donation because surgery was not so advanced in those days. When scriptures are silent, tradition is often invoked. I am all for tradition. But, higher than tradition is the Truth. And, the Truth is, our religion is based on Ushta or happiness and happiness comes to one who makes others happy. Let us never stray away from this fundamental precept.

To conclude, let’s not make an issue out of this. If you feel like donating blood to save a life go right ahead and donate. If you wish to donate your cornea, kidney, liver or heart after death, go ahead. You could also donate your skin and bring relief to a person who is badly burnt and in agony. But, if you do not wish to do so, that also would be alright. After all, whose body is it anyway?

This response is neither written with the intent to fan the flame of this latest controversy nor to offend any orthodox/traditional sentiments. To each their own … for those who wish to donate their organs after death, no coaxing will ever be needed and those who do not wish to, no argument will be possible.

From dust I came and to dust I shall return or from life I came and to life I shall give back and live on in someone else’s eye or heart. That choice is entirely yours!

(Published in today‘s Jam-e-jamshed)