Anahita Irani – Sweet Annu


Hi There, My name is Anahita Irani, I am the author at Sweetannu.com. A pre school teacher, social media influencer, lifestyle & food blogger. Added hobbies are travel, movies and fashion, going for events, socializing, networking and making new friends. Check out her interesting blog at  https://sweetannu.com

Food : Authentic Bhakra Recipe – Click Here

I can proudly proclaim to be married into a bhakra loving family as l clearly remember my mother-in-law making bhakras in her Dahanu home every Sunday, cooling them and packing them in a big stainless steel box for her son. It was a ritual every Sunday evening, once all the other household work was done it was time to make Bhakras. A big thali was taken and all the ingredients were mixed with a heavy hand. My mother-in-law would instruct the maid to knead with a heavy hand and add according to the recipe in her head. She never used measured proportions yet the bhakras turned out delicious every time.

Travel : Visit Deolali – Click Here

The Bhadhurji Sanatorium

Just opposite the Netarwalla Sanitorium and Agyari compound is the Dr.K.N. Bahadurji Memorial Sanatorium. The  Sanatorium was inaugurated on 15th August 1902  and is specifically for  Parsi/Irani community. It is spread over 12.5 acres of land, such a picturesque and sprawling property, once I enter I feel like Alice in Wonderland.

 

And Much More in Fashion, Lifestyle, Education……

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Road to Enterprise


Part 1 : The Rise of the Parsis

The Parsis are one of Indias most well-known business communities. Catch the story of their journey from a predominantly agrarian beginning to the pioneers of Indian industry.

Part 2 :

Naushad Forbes, Co-Chairman, Forbes Marshal, shares his thoughts on his family legacy , the Parsi way of doing business and the way ahead .

 

Gathas : Songs my father taught me


The Alliance Française de Pune 

and 

Poona Music Society

presents 

concert called 

“Gathas : Songs my father taught me.” 

by 

Ariana Vafadari 

under the label of 

Bonjour India 2017-18. 

http://pune.afindia.org/events/bonjour-india-gathas-with-ariana-vafadari/ 

Thursday, 22nd February | 7 PM
Mazda Hall, Dastur Primary School, Camp
FREE ENTRANCE

The Gathas are the prayers of Zoroastrianism, the monotheistic religion of Ancient Persia. These poems from philosopher and prophet Zarathustra date from about 3700 years. They are surprisingly modern, expressing the life, doubts and choices of a man. As there are no records of the way they were sung originnally, Franco-Iranian Ariana Vafadari composed every song according to radifs or oriental scales. It results in music that constantly vibrates between its Oriental mystic foundations and their matching Western opera. Ariana Vafadari and her musicians have a common trait, they unremittingly stretch musical boundaries. In perfect continuity with their cultural and musical backgrounds, they were trained by traditional Iranian, Ottoman and Moroccan music, jazz, Western classical music or opera, in their improvisations and the practice of their instruments, they travel freely from one world to the next.

The third edition of Bonjour India 2017-18 is a four-month-long mega voyage across India that will celebrate Indo-French partnership as well as shape the next decade of human exchange between the two countries.

 

 

This concert is organised in association with Poona Music Society.

World Zoroastrian Congress – Early bird closes on 21 February 2018


Just Informing everyone that the 11th WZC speakers & programme has been uploaded on website. There will be new & innovative subjects & speakers.
Do check it out!

Early bird closes on 21 February 2018. Price for the normal registration will be $575 from 22 February 2018 (early bird is $499).

Please do inform your family and friends also. Thanks and hope to see you there!!

https://www.11wzcperth.com.au/

ETHNIC CLEANSING


Years ago

There was a blood bath

Where we Zoroastrians were

Too victims of Ethnic Cleansing
Slaughtered & butchered  like goats.

Fast forward a few

Hundred years

Landed on the

Shores of Sanjan

Pleading with

Requesting Hindu king

For assylum

Who apparently

Was a true human

Did not believe in

Ethnic Cleansing!

He saved us from

A catastrophe

For Zoroastrians from

Being totally annihilated

But, alas we haven’t

Learn’t from past mistakes

 

Zoroastrian is a religion

Preaches  tolerance

Respect Dignity & Equality

Unfortunately there is still

Practice of systematic

Racism Discrimination

And Bigotry

In other words

Ethnic Cleansing!

Look around &

One will see

World wide

People are marching

In protest to demand

Freedom & Equality

So what are we

Doing about it?

Encouraging “Ethnic Cleansing”

It takes “Two to Tango”

As I have said

No one Owns the Religion”

So wake up & smell the roses

Before it’s too late

Please don’t encourage

“Ethnic Cleansing

If one is a True Zoroastrian

Choicest Happiness

Farida Bamji

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zoroastrians Celebrating “Jashn-e Sadeh” In Yazd


The central province of Yazd is home to a large population of Iranian Zoroastrians. This past Tuesday, they celebrated the annual mid-winter feast “Jashn-e Sadeh” by preparing a large bonfire (also known as Adur-Jashan, or Feast of fire).

The annual festivity honors fire, the defeat of darkness/cold and signifies the coming of Spring.

Click Here for more pics

The Tata Centre for Development Announces 14 New Research Projects


The Tata Centre for Development Announces 14 New Research Projects, New Affiliation with Becker Friedman Institute

The projects, led by nearly two dozen UChicago faculty and researchers across six schools and divisions, will add to TCD’s robust research agenda.

Dear Friends and Colleagues:

With tremendous excitement, I am writing to share that the Tata Centre for Development at UChicago (TCD) has selected 14 new research projects to launch in 2018. The projects represent a total of $1.6 million in funding directed to outstanding research projects and will be led by nearly two dozen UChicago faculty and graduate students from six different schools and divisions.
 
It is also my pleasure to announce that TCD has joined the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics (BFI) as an affiliated center, strengthening TCD’s partnership with the Chicago Economics community. As the faculty director for both TCD and BFI, I look forward to expanding the depth and scope of work by UChicago scholars to leverage evidence-driven research to help address economic and social challenges in India. TCD is supported by Tata Trusts and we look forward to an ongoing partnership around this important work.

Learn More about Tata Trusts 

“Rigorous, economic research has always been the foundation of TCD’s work to address development challenges in India. Through our relationship with the Becker Friedman Institute and the exciting portfolio of new projects, we aim to achieve significant impact by translating new research into actionable policy insights.”

– Manoj Kumar, Senior Advisor and Head of Innovation, Tata Trusts

TATA CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT

New Grants and Expanded Research Agenda

TCD’s affiliation with BFI will strengthen the University’s long-standing commitment to India, which also includes the University of Chicago Center in Delhi, the Energy Policy Institute’s India office (EPIC-India), and the South Asian Languages and Civilizations DepartmentTCD utilizes cutting edge research from across the Chicago economics community, coupled with resources to translate and disseminate rigorous ideas, to improves lives throughout India.
 
TCD has selected 14 new research projects to launch in 2018. The projects were selected as part of a months-long process that began with an open call to Chicago faculty and researchers in October, and culminated with selection by a majority-independent review committee and the Tata Trusts. The projects represent a total of $1.6 million in funding and will involve a multi-disciplinary mix of UChicago faculty and graduate students from six different schools and divisions.

View the 2018-2019 Research Grants
 
The new grants will expand TCD’s research portfolio to include a wide range of issue areas: water pollution and measurement, climate change, education, air pollution, fiscal policy, human capital, land policy and more. In the tradition of Chicago economics, much of this research extends beyond the conventional boundaries of the economics profession and into areas where economics can lend new insights. Across all of this work, TCD will work with researchers to connect new ideas to policymakers, innovators, and entrepreneurs to ensure that research and pilot projects have real-world impact.

The TCD has been partnering with UChicago faculty and centers since its founding in 2016. More information on existing research projects can be found here
 

From Our Grantees

Anjali Adukia, Assistant Professor, The University of Chicago, Harris School of Public Policy and the College, and 2018 TCD grant recipient


“This exciting partnership will not only enable scholars at the University of Chicago to conduct high-quality, deeply grounded research in India, but it will also facilitate the translation of that work such that it can inform and influence real-world policy and practice.” 

Dr. Nishant Agrawal, Chief of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, UChicago Medicine, and 2018 TCD grant recipient 


“The need for low-cost, non-invasive scalable interventions for diseases like cancer and diabetes is becoming increasingly urgent worldwide, including in India. For researchers like me, a key challenge is finding partners who can help lay the groundwork and connect research ideas to practical ideas for implementation.This grant provides a unique opportunity to translate research insights for early diagnosis of oral cancer into interventions that can benefit people’s lives.” 

John List, The Kenneth C. Griffin Distinguished Service Professor in Economics and Chairman, Department of Economics, and 2018 TCD grant recipient


“TCD will provide me a unique opportunity to collaborate with researchers and innovators in India and across the world to identify promising solutions for addressing India’s most pressing educational challenges.”

From left: Nicole Anderson and Michael Greenstone

TATA CENTRE FOR DEVELOPMENT

Staff & Leadership

TCD’s professional staff is located in Chicago and Delhi. We are delighted that Nicole Anderson has joined the Chicago team as U.S. Director of Programs. In this position, she will facilitate TCD research and activities within the University of Chicago community. Nicole brings energy and experience to the position, having previously served as interim TCD Country Director and as Associate Director of Talent and Program Operations at the International Innovation Corps at the University of Chicago, where she led the development of the strategy for recruiting top young professionals from around the world.

Ammon Johnson will remain with TCD’s Chicago team as Finance Manager. Aalia Khan leads financial operations in India, and Priyam Pandey leads our efforts related to training and education. Anant Sudarshancurrently serves as TCD’s Interim Country Director. I am happy to share that a search is underway for a permanent Country Director based in Delhi.

We will keep you updated on new developments as we undertake this exciting work.

Regards,

Michael Greenstone
Director, Tata Centre for Development and Becker Friedman Institute for Economics; Milton Friedman Professor in Economics, the College, and the Harris School

Learn more at tcd.uchicago.edu

Daily Prayers of the Zoroastrians


 

I have recently reprinted the prayer book shown in the picture above.
It is a wonderful translation & transliteration of the Daily Zoroastrian prayers into simple English with meanings and insightful explanatory notes which, when read along with the daily prayers, gave me a new joy of understanding, comprehending and analysing, rather than simply reciting by rote the words that I knew out of habit.

I strongly feel that Framroz Rustomjee’s timelessly relevant words of advice stand good for all of us, be it parents teaching their children the Navjote prayers or adults seeking to understand the philosophy of Zoroastrianism better.

It is available for Rs 200 at the Parsiana bookshop, Zoroastrian Studies bookshop and & Minoi Meher outside the Anjuman Atashbehram in Mumbai. Or contact me by email: jiloob@gmail.com

Proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to charity.

Jiloo Billimoria

What is Ardibahesht Yasht?


What is Ardibahesht Yasht? (Ervad Dr. Ramiyar Parvez Karanjia)

 

Ardibahesht Yasht is the shortest among the ‘shorter Yashts’. It is also one of the most favourite among Zoroastrians, perhaps because of its length and efficacy.

 

Ardibahesht Ameshaspand: He is the divine being who presides over fire. In Zoroastrian understanding fire does not only mean physical fire but also all energies. So Ardibahesht Ameshaspand, on a physical plane presides also over different types of Energies – Physical, and spiritual (Khoreh). Ardibahesht Ameshaspand also presides over health, as the real source of health and healing is divine energy

 

The word Ardibahesht comes form the Pahlavi words Ard Vahisht (Av. Asha Vahishta “the Best Truth”). The word Asha is understood in several ways: divine law, order, beauty, truth, righteousness, holiness, piety, purity, etc. Each of these meanings are inter-connected.

 

The words Asha Vahishta also imply the “Divine Plan” of Ahura Mazda which all of us need to understand and follow. Ardibahesht is the 3rd roj of the month and the 2nd mah of the Zoroastrian calendar.

 

From an ethical viewpoint, Ardibahesht represents the truth and from a metaphysical viewpoint he represents The (Ultimate) Truth which is manifested when one can understand Asha, that is one’s “Life’s Purpose” and subsequently reach Asha Vahishta – the “Divine Plan” of Ahura Mazda. this is the only way to get Ushta “inner happines. This is also the message of the Ashem Vohu prayer.

 

Ardibahesht Ameshaspand on the Cosmic plane is the Cosmic Plan that God put into motion with all its attendant laws, especially the law of cause and effect.

 

Ardibahesht Ameshaspand is the chief divinity of the Rapithwin Gah. Winter is considered evil (druj-e-zimistan) in Zoroastrian tradition. Ardibahesht Ameshaspand fights winter. That is why in Iran during winter Rapithwin Gah was not recited as it was believed that Ardibahesht Ameshaspand had gone underground to give warmth to the earth. He would surface after winter, hence Rapithwan Geh could be recited once again from Farvardin mah.

 

Co-workers:

 

The Hamkars “co-workers” of Ardibahesht Ameshaspand are Adar Yazad who presides over fire and Khvarena “divine energy”, Sarosh Yazad who brings intuitions and divine guidance, and Behram Yazad who presides over victory and success. The two grades of fire – Atash Adaran and Atash Behram are associated with Ardibahesht who as an Ameshaspand looks after fire.

 

The Associates of Ardibahesht Ameshaspand are the Yazads Airyaman and Saoka. Airyaman is for harmony as also for repelling diseases, physical and mental illnesses, negativities and death. Through Saoka Yazad comes all happiness that is destined for the world. He keeps back the demons inflicting more than necessary punishment on the souls.

 

Druj

 

“lie, deceit” is the adversary of Ardibahesht. It is responsible for evils resulting from chaos, disharmony and lies. On a physical plane, it brings severe winters.

 

Asha Vahishta is one of the most basic concepts in Avesta. The three short Avestan chants– Ashem Vohu, Yatha Ahu Vairyo and Yenghe Hatam – revolve around Asha Vahishta. Ahura Mazda, Zarathushtra, Amesha Spentas and all other divine beings are referred to as ashavan, that is “in accord with Asha – The Truth.”

 

Ardibahesht Yasht:

 

In the beginning of the Yaht, Ahura Mazda tells Zarathushtra that among the Ameshaspands, Ardibahesht is the foremost for adoration and veneration. Zarathushtra agrees to venerate Ardibahesht as the foremost Ameshaspand (1-2). We are told that it is possible to reach Garothman “the Highest Heaven”, the abode of Ahura Mazda, through the help of Ardibahesht Ameshaspand (3-4).

 

Thereafter the prayer of Airyaman Yazad is mentioned as the most powerful against all evils including Angra Mainyu (5).

 

Five types of healing are mentioned: 1. Asho baeshazo“Healing with Asha/Truth” (this may also mean healing as per the divine Plan), 2. Dāto baeshazo “Healing with Law / justice”, 3. Kereto baeshazo “healing with surgery”, 4. Urvaro baeshazo “Healing with herbs”, 5.Mānthro baeshazo “Healing with prayers.” Among these, healing by prayers is considered best as it heals from within. (6)

 

Thereafter powerful autosuggestions are given against evils. A desire is expressed that may evils like sickness, demons, opponents, snakes, inimical persons, evil women and harmful north-winds perish (apa-dvarata) (7-9). The devotee then urges Ardibahesht Ameshaspand to smite (jainti) the above mentioned and similar other evils for him. The devotee has the confidence that Ardibahesht Ameshaspand will smite (janat) thousands of demons, the worst of the demons including the arch demon Angra Mainyu. and drive them away towards the north (10-16).

 

In the end a desire is expressed that may the evil perish and flee towards the North, so that the rest of the world may not be harmed (17). This thought is expressed even at the end of the Kem nā Mazdā prayer. The Yasht ends with Avesta and Pazand passages similar to other Yashts.

 

After the Yasht, the Nirang is recited, which is held to be very efficacious. It is recited even as a prayer by itself and is often prayed over people who are not well. In the Nirang, Ahura Mazda is extolled and Ahriman is referred as ignorant and wicked, who should be defeated and destroyed. Zoroastrian religion and Ahura Mazda are praised at the end.

 

It is advisable to recite the short Airyaman prayer immediately after reciting the Ardibahesht Yasht and its Nirang.

 

There are two traditions firmly associated with Ardibahesht Yasht in our Community. Both these traditions underlie two of Ardibahesht. Ameshaspand’s basic characteristics, the first is its association with health and the second is with truth.

 

The first tradition is Ardibahesht ni picchi, in which, a devotee prays for a dear one or for self in case of ill health. Whilst praying the Ardibahesht Yasht, passes are made either by hand or by a handkerchief over the person’s body from head to toe and then the negative energy is shaken off.

 

The other tradition is Ardibahesht ni chavi which means moving a key with the help of Ardibahesht ameshaspand. It has to be done by a pious, adept person to identify a culprit in case of loss or theft. For this purpose, an iron key is kept in a Khordeh Avesta over which a Kasti is tied. Then fire is lit in a small Afarganyu and a person prays the Farajyat prayers followed by the Ardibahesht Yasht. Then the key is supported on the fingertips and the list of suspects is read out. On the name of the culprit the key is supposed to turn round and the Khordeh Avesta falls down. If this happens on the same name for 4 to 5 times, it is believed that the particular suspect is the culprit. Performing the Ardibahesht ni chhavi presupposes a certain level of spiritual statue, regular practice of the religious tariqats and a certain level of abstinence in the person who performs it. Without these, one may not get the correct results. Hence in present times there is a risk in doing this practice or else an innocent person may be unnecessarily be blamed.

Image may contain: fire

 

Looking for details about Kaikhosru Jamsett


I’ve been looking with great interest at your Parsi Directory online and wonder if you can help me further, as I am looking to trace my ancestors in Bombay and would greatly appreciate any assistance or advice you can offer.
My name is Elizabeth Brown (nee Jamsett) and I live in the UK.  My grandfather, Kaikhosru Jamsett, a Parsi, was born in Bombay around 1873 and he qualified as a Doctor in Bombay on or before 1902.
In 1908 he was in London studying at the London School of Tropical Medicine, which was founded in 1899 with the help of a donation from Parsi philanthropist Bomanjee Dinshaw Petit.
Kaikhosru Jamsett married Ada Wood in 1911 and lived and practiced in Canning Town, London until his death in 1929. Kaikhosru Jamsett’s father was Jamsetji Framji Polshuda (a frame maker & builder. Deceased by 1911).
The family believe that he knew Mahatma Gandhi and that his wife Ada, met with Gandhi when he stayed in Canning Town for 3 months in 1931.
I appreciate you are busy but would be most grateful if you could give advice on the best way to trace my ancestors in Bombay or indeed, recommend someone who may be able to help, as I am struggling to find further information from the UK.  I would of course be willing to pay for the service.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Yours sincerely
Elizabeth Brown
elizabethbrown9@me.com