Register for Jamva Chaloji


 

Sunday April 26, 2015

Date: Saturday May 16th, 2015

Time: 6:30 PM onwards

Venue: The Community Church of Glen Rock,
354 Rock Road, Glen Rock, NJ 07452

Tickets: $ 100 per Adult and $ 40 per Child (12 years and below)

Register Now

Our mailing address is:

Zoroastrian Association of Greater New York

106 Pomona Road

Suffern, NY 10901

Eating in Thousands !


It’s a fight for a seat, and sometimes, a chicken leg, at the Parsi gahambar that celebrates an age-old tradition of praying and feasting.

At 8 pm on March 21, stewards from legendary caterer Tanaz Godiwala’s team were on stand-by like soldiers awaiting a general’s order, even as a line of cooks poured bubbling hot sweet-sour, butter-flour saas from saucepans into aluminium trays stacked with succulent boneless chunks of steamed rawas. The saas-nimacchi was soon making the rounds of aisles in a makeshift seating area at Dadar Parsi Colony where a dinner was underway on the occasion of Navroze, the holiest day of the Zoroastrian calendar, marking the Spring Equinox.

They were carrying on a tradition that some say, dates back to the times of Prophet Zoroaster. The feast that his followers in India, the Parsis, call gahambar or gahanbar – a middle Persian name for community feasting held at the end of six seasons of the Zoroastrian calendar – was held through the year to celebrate the creation of the sky, water, earth, plants, beneficent animals, mankind, and fire. Each festival originally lasted one day, but following a calendar reform, was extended to six, and finally reduced to five – the first four days dedicated to prayer, and the last to communal eating where everyone participated, either by bringing dairy, meat, legumes and vegetables or offering their cooking services.

“Currently, a gahambar is celebrated as a community event for Zoroastrians, where a thanksgiving meal is preceded by a jashan or prayer. The feasting may be sponsored either for a living person or in memory of the dear departed or simply as an act of spiritu- a l merit,” says Ervad Dr Ramiyar Karanjia, Zoroastrian scholar and priest. Most gahambars are free, with coupons distributed at landmark Parsi stores and colonies, while some are ticketed. The menu can vary as can the guest list.

Bharuch, a city that sits at the mouth of the Narmada, recently served as venue for a mithai gahambar, where the menu was dedicated to desserts. Some feasts are reserved only for women or men, with the express purpose of hewing down boisterous crowds that don’t shy away from fighting for their share of salli ma marghi.

Prepping for the big hour

In a more leisurely time than ours, the rich and poor came together to celebrate. Bhicoo Manekshaw writes in her book, Parsi Food and Customs, “each person may contribute to the function what they can, and rich and poor come together to eat. If a person is too poor, he can even help with the preparation of the food. The meal is simple – masala ni dar ne chawal. Sometimes, someone may contribute an additional dish, which is usually a mutton dish like papeta ma gos (mutton and potatoes).”

This community service is now a memory. All the cooking and serving at modern gahambars is handled by professional caterers, who charge a smidgeon of their regular fees as a service to their community.

Kurush Dalal, archaeologist and caterer at Katy’s Kitchen, has manned the kitchen for Dahanu’s once famous annual gahambar, known to draw 4,000 guests from across the country. Dar-chawal (dal-rice) and stew tend to be staples, he says, although deep pockets often mean that a mutton dish is thrown in. “At the Dahanu gahambar,” he recounts, “we served 200 kg of mutton.” The dal remains the beating heart of the meal, especially in the towns scattered across Gujarat.

Dalal, who remembers his grandfather recounting gahambar tales, says intrepid gahambar-goers would carry lemons in their pocket, because caterers wouldn’t serve lime wedges to squeeze over the dar. “This was later confirmed by my father. In fact, Gustaad Irani, who hosted the Dahanu gahambar, told him he was proud that he was one of the few hosts to serve the guests an abundant supply of lemons.”

The five-day affair may have been pared down, but preparations continue on a daunting scale. Cooking usually starts the previous night. “We bring in the meat at about 3 am before leaving it to marinate for an hour in aadu-lasan (ginger-garlic paste). It’s then slowcooked in giant handis overnight, on mango wood,” says Dalal. The catering staff works overnight to finish prepping, so that the dar can be shifted to the stove to slowly bubble away. “This is because most gahambars are held at lunch time.” The tapelas (pots) are so large, four adults could sit in one. Naturally, once mounted on the fire, they aren’t moved until after the service.

The big Mumbai feast

Philanthrophist Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, an orphan who made his fortune by trading in cotton and opium with China, is often credited with reviving Mumbai’s gahambar tradition by donating a handsome sum to the Bombay Parsi Punchayet for the same. Now, most feasts are organised by individuals or charity trusts set up exclusively for the purpose. “We usually hear of them in Parsi newspapers, or through friends. I start queuing at noon to get a seat,” says Bakhtavar Batliwalla, a gahambar regular. But as night falls, crowds swell at Charni Road’s Albless Baug, a common venue for Parsi weddings. Unlike Manekshaw’s frugal meal, some gahambars rival wedding feasts. “At the last three feasts, there was salli marghi, tarkari par eeda (eggs on vegetables), egg curry rice, cold drinks, achaar and ice cream,” says a satisfied Batliwalla.

At the Dadar Parsi Colony gahambar (in pics) held by the Mancherji Edalji Joshi Memorial Trust, Godiwala served saas ni macchi, dabba gosht, mutton pulao dal, salli marghi, foil chicken, akuri, custard, ice cream and chocolate lava cake. At the recent Shapoorji Pallonji gahambar at Turf Club, waiters plied hungry diners with everything from samosas to gulab jamun.

Clearly, the feast serves as social glue, braiding the scattered community. “It fosters a spirit of unity. It goes beyond the rich-poor divide and works to the common end of progress and prosperity,” says Karanjia.

GAHUMBARS OF GUJARAT

The stories behind why each gahumbar is held are sometimes as delicious as the eats served on the occasion.

In Variav, a village that sits on the banks of the Tapti river in Surat district, once lived several Parsi families ruled by a brazen Rajput king, who taxed his subjects mercilessly. The Parsis rebelled, and to quell the protest, the king sent mercenaries to Variav. The men were away at work, with only women and elderly at home. Not to cower in the face of a challenge, the women dressed in male attire, drew their swords and fought the mercenaries. It was only when one of them noticed a earring on one of the ladies’ that they realised they were about to be beaten by women. Furious, they came on stronger, forcing the women to retreat and jump into the river, to avoid capture. The elderly lived to tell the tale.

Forever and after, the men of the village held a gahambar on that day each year to honour and remember the feat of their brave wives and sisters. It is said that the only dish to grace the table was vaal (a type of white bean); its bitterness a reminder of their sacrifice.

In the sleepy hamlet of Sanjan, on November 17 every year, a gahumbar is held to mark the occasion when Persian refugees fleeing Muslim Arab invaders in the eighth century, landed in Gujarat. Parsis celebrate the occasion as Sanjan Day by hosting a grand vegetarian gahambar. Last year, the Flying Ranee that shuttles each day between Surat and Mumbai Central, even made a special twominute halt at Sanjan, for droves of Parsis rushing there.

Elsewhere, a less momentous event draws families from Thane and Valsad districts. The junglewasi gahambar sees men who manage their farms come together with their wives who live and work on the coast, once a year. In the pre-prohibition days, palm wine or toddy was served to cool parched throats. “It’s a great place to catch up on who got married, who died, who had children and who ran away,” laughs Kurush Dalal, who has catered for the junglewasi gahumbar in the past.

By Meher Mirza

Parsi food, now at your doorstep


Catering service the Bawi Bride Kitchen, which serves Parsi food, will launch its delivery services next month. sundaymid-day samples a meal, which comprises old Parsi favourites including Sali per eedu 
 
Perzen Patel, Chief Tasting Officer of the Bawi Bride Kitchen, the catering service which aims to make ‘Parsi food easily available’ to all, is all set to launch the venture’s food delivery service, titled Bhonu by Bawi Bride. The service, says Patel, will be launched on May 1.
Perzin Patel, founder of Bawi Bride

Perzin Patel, founder of Bawi Bride
The meals are carefully planned out throughout the month, to include a variety of dishes such as Chicken Ras Chawal, Chicken Vindaloo, Prawn Pulao and Fish Moilee among many others. There are four different packages — Ravenous (Rs 11,600 per month, R2000 per week), Starving (Rs 9,800 per month, Rs 1,750 per week), Very Hungry (Rs 8,000 per month, Rs 1,500 per week) and Hungry (Rs 5,250 per month, Rs 1,000 per week). The weekly meals are available from Monday to Friday and the prices exclude delivery charges.
(Clockwise from left) Green Mutton Curry, Sali Par Eddu, Plain Rice, Potato Cheese Cutlet, pav and fruits. pic/Romita Chakroborty

(Clockwise from left) Green Mutton Curry, Sali Par Eddu, Plain Rice, Potato Cheese Cutlet, pav and fruits. pic/Romita Chakroborty
We order a ‘Ravenous’ meal, which includes steamed white rice, two pieces of pav, Green mutton curry, Sali per eedu, Potato cheese cutlets and a small bowl of cut apples, bananas and oranges.

Green mutton curry: Main ingredients include coriander, coconut, jeera, green chillies and haldi among others. The meat is cooked with the curry masala in the cooker, to spread the flavour and taste of mutton to the entire curry. While the carnivore in our team finds the meat a tad too chewy for her taste, we like the flavoursome gravy. The dominant taste of ingredients such as dhana jeera and the meat preside over everything else, making this dish a favourite.
Sali per eedu: Made with pureed tomatoes, turmeric, red chilli powder, coriander, cumin powder, garam masala, salli and eggs, we like the Sali per eedu. Sure, we have had a fancier versions of this classic Parsi dish in the past, but we like the dish’s simple, no-frills version – exactly what we would like to have on a more daily basis. Some of us felt the potato sticks could have been crispier, but still, we like this traditional Parsi dish.
Potato cheese cutlets: We, unanimously, agree that the cutlets are a tad too salty for our taste. The cutlets are stuffed with cheese and other ingredients such as mashed potato, cooked with dhana jeera powder, salt and pepper and garam masala. We love the cutlets when we combine it with the steamed rice, but if only salt wasn’t so liberally sprinkled.
Bhonu by Bawi Bride – Launching 1 May, 2015

Perzen Patel

Chief Tasting Officer | Bawi Bride

Eating in Thousands


EATING IN THOUSANDS

Mumbai Mirror | Apr 19, 2015, 05.04 AM IST
Eating in thousands
From top: Stewards wait to serve the main course of mutton palav dar at the Dadar Parsi Colony Navroze gahambar last month; Lagan nu custard is a staple at gahambars and wedding feasts; Gahambar enthusiasts are known to line up in advance to bag comfortable seats; Trays carrying saas-ni-macchi; Crisp sago wafers dipped in gajar meva achaar makes for a piquant appetiser
By Meher Mirza

It’s a fight for a seat, and sometimes, a chicken leg, at the Parsi gahambar that celebrates an age-old tradition of praying and feasting.

At 8 pm on March 21, stewards from legendary caterer Tanaz Godiwala’s team were on stand-by like soldiers awaiting a general’s order, even as a line of cooks poured bubbling hot sweet-sour, butter-flour saas from saucepans into aluminium trays stacked with succulent boneless chunks of steamed rawas. The saas-nimacchi was soon making the rounds of aisles in a makeshift seating area at Dadar Parsi Colony where a dinner was underway on the occasion of Navroze, the holiest day of the Zoroastrian calendar, marking the Spring Equinox.

They were carrying on a tradition that some say, dates back to the times of Prophet Zoroaster. The feast that his followers in India, the Parsis, call gahambar or gahanbar – a middle Persian name for community feasting held at the end of six seasons of the Zoroastrian calendar – was held through the year to celebrate the creation of the sky, water, earth, plants, beneficent animals, mankind, and fire. Each festival originally lasted one day, but following a calendar reform, was extended to six, and finally reduced to five – the first four days dedicated to prayer, and the last to communal eating where everyone participated, either by bringing dairy, meat, legumes and vegetables or offering their cooking services.

“Currently, a gahambar is celebrated as a community event for Zoroastrians, where a thanksgiving meal is preceded by a jashan or prayer. The feasting may be sponsored either for a living person or in memory of the dear departed or simply as an act of spiritu- a l merit,” says Ervad Dr Ramiyar Karanjia, Zoroastrian scholar and priest. Most gahambars are free, with coupons distributed at landmark Parsi stores and colonies, while some are ticketed. The menu can vary as can the guest list.

The Taste of a Parsi Home Fare


All this comes to life at Rustom’s Parsi Bhonu, a Parsi home-style restaurant in Adchini in Delhi, run by Kainaz Contractor and Rahul Dua. Both are 28 years old and have a background in hospitality as they did their management training together. Dua wished ‘to open a Parsi restaurant in Delhi’ while Contractor wished to open ‘her own restaurant some day’. Contractor, who shifted base from Mumbai to Delhi to open Rustom’s, says, “My interactions with many people led me to feel that there is space for an authentic Parsi-style restaurant in Delhi. Since this is not a funded project, Dua and I thought the delivery model would work well as it made for sustainable business. To add to the thought, Delhi people order in a lot unlike Mumbai people. At Rustom’s, we have mostly non-Parsis and youngsters ordering in. And we receive maximum orders on Sunday for lunches.” Adapting to Delhi was easy for her as she liked the city and has lived here earlier. The restaurant is named after her father. The duo have showcased Parsi style through the ambience, as it is done up to recreate an old Parsi home. The grandfather clock and the crockery cupboard add antique touches. The tiles they have used are found in typical Parsi homes. The space at Rustom’s is small and hence exudes a home-like warmth. “The menu has pictures of my own family and across the restaurant we have images from Sooni Taraporevala’s famous book Parsis: The Zoroastrians of India. Some pictures are for sale as well,” reveals Contractor.

On the menu front, the  place showcases close to 30 dishes. “These have been carefully chosen keeping in mind home-style dishes that can be perfectly executed in a restaurant format or those that are restaurant worthy,” says Contractor, adding, “Of course, there were a lot of trials and toil that went in before the final menu came out. The final dishes are ones that we personally like and believe people will like them too. The dishes are not too unfamiliar in terms of taste. These are dishes that people in Delhi will like. Once people take to the food currently being served, we shall introduce some offal dishes, but that will have to wait a bit.”

Dua’s contribution to Rustom’s, in his own words, was “to make sure the home-style cooking blended seamlessly into the restaurant format, for no one wants to be served ghar ka khana in a restaurant. So I took upon myself to ensure the presentation was not home-style, even if the dish was. I also helped find chefs and train them.” Dua, who has tasted success at Cafe Lota (which he runs with three others), lauds his partner for her food training and says, “Kainaz went to Nagpur to her aunt and trained with her for a month and a half, as also under her own mom to get her recipes right.” Since this is Dua’s first independent venture, it “marks my foray into the kind of restaurants I want to open in Delhi and elsewhere,” he says. Though he reiterates he is not here to please everybody, Dua and Contractor are cautious in their approach. “For now, we have started with what we thought was rightly suited for the Delhi palate. For our Patra Ni Machi, we use Tilapia fish whereas Pomfret would be our first choice. But most people in Delhi turn a nose to smelly fish or that, which has bones. After introducing our patrons to Parsi home-style food, we shall present some of our takes on Parsi food, but that will come in a little later. Our food is more of a tribute to the Parsi community. We are serving, what is essentially Indian food, that is very comforting,” quips Dua.

An offering that renders uniqueness to Rustom’s is the stock of regional products displayed for sale. “Since we are a regional Indian specialty restaurant we do believe in encouraging those engaged in the food-chain at our restaurant by offering their products for sale. We stock Parsi cane vinegar, dhansak masala, sambhar masala, vindaloo masala, Pallonji sodas, carrot and raisin pickle into two varieties—home-made and commercially packaged,” says Contractor, adding, “it is natural when we taste a new cuisine we like to recreate some of it in our own kitchens”.

By Tanu Datta

Published: 12th April 2015 06:00 AM

 http://www.newindianexpress.com/lifestyle/food/The-Taste-of-a-Parsi-Home-Fare/2015/04/12/article2756518.ece

The Food Gallery


Dear All,

This is to inform all members that Farhad Aibara (My partner) and myself have started a new business in the food industry.  We are known by the name of The Food Gallery and operate from Shop No.1, Roopanand Apts, Next to Hotel Signature, Lullanagar, Pune 40.  We basically wish to enter into corporate catering but we also do Outdoor Catering Services along with a retail counter at our store selling snacks and full meals.  If any of you have any leads in companies or have any requirements please do let us know.
Our Nos for contacts are:  Mabrin 9822000433
Farhad: 9890529833
Shop: 65247657.
Thanking You
Mabrin Noshir Nanavatti
Visit us at : http://www.justdial.com/Pune/The-Food-Gallery

For the love of eggs


Cheese and eggs at Smokehouse Deli
 
 
On the love of eggs that unite Parsis and Bengali
I tried the eggs and cheese scrambled egg at Bandra’s Smoke House Deli recently and immediately thought of how much my mother in law would like this creamy, cheesy, eggy dish.
A few days later I went to Smokehouse with her and K and ordered these eggs and sure enough my mom in law loved them.
At Smoke House with my Bawi girls
The Parsi love for eggs

The thing about Parsis is that they are besotted with eggs. They add eggs to every possible dish. Their pulaos should have boiled eggs. Egg and chutney pattice (egg croquettes) are their favourite snacks. Their favourites desserts, the laganu and caramel custards, have eggs in them. The only way to get them to eat vegetables is to break an egg on the greens. So you have tomato per eendu (eggs on tomato), bhaji per eendu (eggs on spinach) and bheenda per eendu (eggs on ladies fingers). Even indulgences like potato chips are embellished with eggs. You guessed it right, wafers per eendu.
In case you didn’t get it by now, eendu means eggs in Parsi Gujarati.
Bhaji per eendu. Our cook Banu had made spinach so my mom in law made her add an egg to i
Incidentally Parsis will have none of this egg white business.
My mom in law often makes me poras when she visits us on weekends. Pora is a garam masala and chilli powder specked spicy Parsi styled omelette.
She makes it with egg whites for me as per my request based on doctor’s orders.
One day I saw my mom in law making an omelette for herself after she made mine.
With the egg yolks that remained from my omelette!
Which reminded me of tales K would tell me of having grown up on eggs fried in butter or even ghee which would shock me since I have grown up in a house where my mother would be most parsimonious about using oil, let alone butter and ghee.
My mom in law has turned vegetarian after my father in law passed away. She has not given up on eggs though.
I feel that my late father in law would approve of her sticking on to eggs. Towards the end of his life he had lot of food restrictions on health counts. He was a very obedient patient and would listen to his doctors.
The one exception that he made was eggs and he would continue to eat eggs even though he stayed largely away from meats and fish.
Mamma, my wife’s later maternal grandmother, would have runny scrambled eggs even when she had the appetite for nothing else towards her final years.
Mama, as we call her son, would make her the eggs even though he is a rare Parsi vegetarian. A ‘real’ one, in this case who does not even eat eggs.
Our uncle J, occasionally decides to tell us lessons he has learnt from life. Top of the list for this octogenarian Parsi is ‘eggs are very good for your health’.

‘Eggs are oxygen to Parsis’, says uncle J.

The only Parsi dish K has ever made for me is salli per eendu or eggs fried over salli (potato straws).
The Bengali chapter
As I began writing this post on the love for eggs that the Parsi half of my family has I realised that eggs were pretty important to the Bengali side of my life too.
In fact the only memory I have of my late paternal grandmother’s cooking revolves around eggs. This is when we had just moved into Kolkata. My thakurma, as paternal grandma is called in Bengali, made me a deemer ‘poach’ which is what we Bengalis call fried eggs.
I was a picky eater in those days and this was the first time that I tried a fried egg or my grandmother’s cooking.
I must have been seven years old then and would fuss and not eat Indian dishes those days. My mom used to cook specially for me and would make me chicken and chips, fried rice, spaghetti and a mince meat stuffed omelette that she called Spanish omelette.
I would normally not eat my thakurma’s cooking as she would make Indian dishes.
Her ‘poached’/ fried egg turned out to be an exception.
I liked it so much that I asked her to make me two or three more after I had the first one and even told my mother to learn how to make it from my thakurma.
My grandmother then told me about how finances were tight when she brought up her children and how my father and all his siblings would share one poach while I was lucky enough to get repeats.
If I do the math right I think that would be one egg between six children!
It is only recently that I realised that real poached eggs are very different from the Bengali deemer poach and are not fried.
In my growing up days in Kolkata I remember people frying up an omelette when I would go to visit them and there were no sweets at home to offer.

Every evening after school I would go to the corner roll shop and buy an egg roll before going out to play with the money my mother left for me. (I remember buying egg rolls at Rs 1.50 in the mid ’80s in Kolkata)

There would be a non-veg element to all our meals at home in Kolkata. My mom stayed off red meat as she had heard it was not good for the heart. So there would be chicken on Sundays. And fish every other day.
On rare days when there was no fish my mom would add eggs to our meal. Usually deemer jhol or egg curry. This was made with hard boiled eggs. The white of the egg would be scored with four slits so that the masala of the gravy would go in. Like the fish in Bengali curries, the egg too would be first fried in spices (koshano) before added to the curry. When she was too tired to make a curry mom would make an omelette. And occasionally she cooked what she called ‘Jolly’s curry’. This was named after a Bengali lady whom she knew in England who taught her the dish. This consisted of a curry which was similar to the chicken curry that mom would normally make. When the curry began to bubble in the pan my mom would crack and drop in the eggs making it a sort of egg drop curry. Saves the time spent in boiling and frying eggs my mom would explain.

I had just begun to cook before I left Kolkata for Mumbai. I remember making omelettes with elaborate stuffings with even liver occasionally for my mom and brother on weekends.

When I used to go back to Kolkata from Mumbai my mom would make the savoury Indian version of French toasts every day for breakfast!
Given the Parsi and Bengali egg fixation it is no surprise that on the day of our marriage K requested me to make her an omelette when we came home from the registrar before heading out for dinner.
It was fitting that the first dish cooked by a Bengali husband for his Parsi wife was an egg one.

Talking of eggs and Parsi do check out this e book on eggs put together by Perzen the Bawi Bride, and Rhea, a Bengali married to a Parsi.

In case you are wondering why my mother doesn’t blog anymore here, it is because she her own blog now. This is her latest post on how her blogging came into being thanks to a computer operator named Raju.

 

A tryst with Parsi flavours


Red Fork in Indiranagar offers a range of contemporary items. Though it provides great breakfast options, burgers and salads, it is mainly known for the delicious Parsi food it serves.

The menu here is carefully curated to capture the seasonal produce from organic, zero pesticide farms. Even the in-house breads, desserts, compotes, dips and ice-creams are completely fresh. Chef Xerxes and his team come up with innovative presentations too.

Run by a Parsi family, the place used to be called Daddy’s Deli before it was given a new identity.

The elaborate breakfast menu consists of a spring onion pancake with smoked salmon and poached egg; breakfast bruschetta with pork; big breakfast with a choice of fried, poached or scrambled eggs; a choice of chicken franks or bacon served with rosemary mushrooms, hash cake and choice of bread, green eggs and ham. There is a wide range of salads available from beetroot, walnut tamarind dressing with house marinated feta to pear parmesan and almond salad.

The filling burgers include chicken Bondi burger with apple tzatziki salad; bacon and cheese and beef patty with cheddar, bacon, jalapeños, spanish onion jam, gherkins, mayo and barbecue sauce.

Some of the delicious dishes offered here are beef tenderloin with Thai style salad and Miso-glazed pan-fried fish on a bed of sesame rice.

The mouth-watering desserts here include orange semolinacake with Cognac ganache and vanilla ice cream; carrot cake with sugared almonds and mascarpone sorbet; baked white chocolate cheesecake with toffee and spiced poached pears.  Red Fork is located on 12th Main, HAL 2nd Stage, Indiranagar.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/468219/a-tryst-parsi-flavours.html

 

Monograph on Zoroastrian Heritage & Nutrition – for Distribution


Dear friends,

Some of the most popular pages on the Zoroastrian Heritage website and blog are the ones relating to Nutrition – in particular the monograph, “Nutrition – Were Ancient Zoroastrians & Aryans Vegetarian?” In addition to seeking answers, the monograph broadly addresses Zoroastrian principles and values.

Complete and abridged pdf versions of the monograph are available for download at:

http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/reference/Nutrition-Eduljee-Complete.pdf

and

http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/reference/Nutrition-Eduljee-Abridged.pdf

A previous monograph, “Farohar/Fravahar Motif. What Does It Represent? Use of Icons & Symbols in Zoroastrianism” can be downloaded at:

Complete: http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/reference/FaroharMotif-Eduljee.pdf (64,426 downloads to March 26, 2015)

and

Abridged: http://www.heritageinstitute.com/zoroastrianism/reference/FaroharMotif-Eduljee-Abridged.pdf (24,203 downloads to March 26, 2015)

 

Regards

K. E. Eduljee

Zoroastrian Heritage website (www.zoroastrianheritage.com)

Zoroastrian Heritage blog (http://zoroastrianheritage.blogspot.ca/)

Courtesy : Dolly Dastoor