Category Archives: Arts & Culture

SOAS PhD FOR NAZNEEN ENGINEER

Having recently been awarded her PhD, Dr. Nazneen Engineer is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher at the SOAS Shapoorji Pallonji Institute of Zoroastrian Studies.
Her interest in Zoroastrian Studies emerged after she attended the December 2007 World Zoroastrian Youth Congress in Australia.
For her doctorate, which was awarded to her on July 24, 2019, at SOAS in London, she produced an annotated translation of a Parsi Gujarati text written in 1883 by a prominent high-priest of the Parsi community. Her post-doctoral journey continues…

Hamaaree deen Zarthoshti – Our Religion, Zarathushtri –

A Religious Gujarati Song

 

  1. mIno:9I getIm%a AavI, pygam prvr t8o lavI,
  2. Meenoeethee geteemaan aawee, paygaam parvar tanoh laawee,
  3. Coming from spiritual to this world, bringing the message of Ahura Mazda

   A=o jr9oSte felavI, hmarI dIn jr9oStI (3)

   Ashoh jarthosteh felaawee, hamaaree deen jarthostee (3)

   Righteous Zarathushtra propagated, our Religion, Zarathushtri (3)

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri

  1. A=o: pr rca; je, sda scpr S9pa; je,

Ashoee pahr rachaaee jeh, sadaa sachpahr sthapaaee jeh,

It is based on Righteousness, established always on truthfulness,

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI (3)

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee (3)

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri (3)

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri

  1. fre+ta jena negheban, Am=aSp%do shu pasban,
  2. fareshtaah jehnaa negahebaan, amshaaspandoh sahu paasbaan,
  3. All the Angels are our Watchmen, all Ameshaaspands are our guardians,

mzdano puà Aat= mhan, hmarI dIn jr9oStI (3)

Mazdaanoh putra aatash mahaan, hamaaree deen jarthostee (3)

Aatash, the son of Ahuramazda, is great, our Religion, Zarathushtri (3)

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri

  1. mn+nI nI `ubI NyarI, gv+nI AejmtI -arI,

Manashnee nee khubee nyaaree, gavashnee ejmatee bhaaree,

Manashnee’s special excellence is wonderful, Gawashnee’s magic is awesome,

kun+nI de jge yarI, hmarI dIn jr9oStI (3)

Kunashnee deh jageh yaaree, hamaaree deen jarthostee (3)

Kunashnee gives help in this world, our Religion, Zarathushtri (3)

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri

(one extra verse from the original song not included in the attached song)

  1. pr=te= jenI gu8karI, sfX 9ay @%dgI sarI,

Parashtesh jehnee gunkaaree, safal thaay jeendagee saaree,

Its following is advantageous, will make your life successful.

de bNne jhanm%a yarI, hmarI dIn jr9oStI (3)

Deh banneh jahaanmaan yaaree, hamaaree deen jarthostee (3)

Will give help in both the worlds, our Religion, Zarathushtri (3)

jgtm%a ßeQ5 mna; je, hmarI dIn jr9oStI

Jagatmaahn shreshtha manaaee jeh, hamaaree deen jarthostee

Believed to be the best (for us) in the world, our Religion, Zarathushtri

                 (By Parsi Poet: Dara Printer, sung by the Marzban and Dara Mehta Brothers orchestra)

SPD Comments:

  1. Parsi Poet Dara Printer was well known among the Parsis in Mumbai. He also wrote the famoussongs: Maahtaab Sum Madhuro and Maaraa Bholaa dilnu, the twosongs sung by none other than Mukesh Bhaiyyaa.

  1. In the fourth verse of thesongabove, Dara Bhai has used Manashnee, Gavashnee and Kunashnee words to mean Humata, Hukhta and Hvarshta (Good Thoughts, Words and Deeds). However, Manashnee Gavashnee and Kunashnee as such mean only Thoughts, Words and Deeds. Dara Bhai has taken poetic license to use shorter form of these words instead of correct words: Hu-manashnee,

Hu-gavashnee and Hu-kunashnee, which are equivalent to Humata, Hukhta and Hvarshta.

  1. It is so sad that such beautiful Parsisongsare becoming a memory of the past. And not many of our young Zoroastrians are writing such wonderful songs in English. May be this is an appeal to them to revive our old Religious Monaajaats and songs in English.

May the Flame of Fellowship, Love, Charity and Respect for all burn ever eternal in our hearts so we can do HIS work with humility, diligence and eternal enthusiasm!

 

In HIS SERVICE 24/7!

Atha Jamyaat, Yatha Aafrinaamahi! (May it be so as we wish!)

Love and Tandoorasti, Soli Dastur

BOMAN IRANI’S INSPIRING JOURNEY FROM A WAITER TO AN ACTOR

‘You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream!’ 

The above quote may have been said by the British scholar and novelist – C.S. Lewis, but no one can prove it better than the maverick photographer turned actor – Boman Irani, who made his Bollywood debut at the age of 44 and made a mark for himself with his excellent comic timing and signature style of acting.

“If there is passion in your heart and fire in your belly there is no one who can stop you from moving forward,” says the Housefull 3 actor, who has done everything in his life with complete passion and honesty, be it acting in front of the camera, capturing photographs through his lenses or waiting tables at The Taj Mahal Palace Hotel as a waiter.

Yeah, today Boman Irani may be one of the most sought after actor who is known for his versatility and brilliant performances in films like Munnabhai M.B.B.SKhosla Ka Ghosla3 Idiots etc., but there was a time when this successful actor worked as a waiter and even sat in his ancestral shop selling chips.

“As a kid I had a speech defect, I had a lisp, I used to actually talk like my character Virus from 3 Idiots. To make matters worse I was dyslexic, who was not good at academics. People used to call me Boman the duffer. So I decided to do a course to be a waiter and joined The Taj Mahal Palace Hotel as a waiter. I worked there for 2 years and put my heart in it. My granny used to say – ‘gali ka mochi bano, toh bhi sabse acha mochi bano’, basically be the best in anything you do and that has stayed with me always,” says Boman.

However, Boman was not destined to be a waiter forever. His mother met with an accident and Boman had to take over his family shop. “I started sitting in our shop. I sat in the shop for over 14 years. It was a long time. So imagine sitting in a shop and saying to myself that I think I am a creative person, I think I need to do something with my ability to either writer, or to understand, or to put down words, or to breakdown a screenplay and understand it…I think I am passionate about all that. Actually, I was a student of cinema since I was 12-years-old. As a kid my mom used to encourage me to see films every day, over and over again. She told me to observe cinematography, acting, music, camera movements, lyrics, lightening… everything. I used to watch movies 30 to 40 times at Alexander theater, so I was passionate about cinema. So what do I do? At 32 nobody was making me an actor because that’s a funny age, you are neither too young nor too old to play characters. So what’s the next best thing to do? I bought a camera from the money that I had saved from the tips I got at Taj as a waiter and decided to become a photographer,” reveals Boman.

He juggled his photography career along with managing the shop and actually succeeded in turning his passion into a paycheck. Initially, Boman made about 25 rupees per picture but soon his go-getting attitude and talent coupled with his passion for succeeding helped him to make 300 dollars per picture. He recalls, “I needed to do something creatively and photography was my outlet. I started with sports photography, my pictures were getting composed pretty well and I used to make about 25 – 30 rupees per picture. I said this is a great outlet, if I can make a profession out of this, then I will be a happy creative soul. That happened too, I bagged my first big project as an official photographer for The World Cup of Boxing that was happening in Mumbai. Then I did some pictures for an international client, for which I got 900 dollars, 300 dollars for each picture. I was thrilled. I was finally a professional photographer.”

And though Boman was content to have found some creative outlet, he wasn’t afraid to experiment further as he says, “One day while I was doing a portfolio for Shiamak Davar, he told me that I need to be on stage. I was like why not, chalo karte hai. He took me to theater thespian Alyque Padamsee, who told me I had no talent. However, Shiamak coaxed him to take me and I did a small role of a pimp in a play called Roshni. The show was a disaster but the press talked about me. Then I did another play and another play and another play… and then suddenly I became a theater actor with successful plays. I started getting film offers but I said no to a lot of movies and a lot of television work. Then one fine day Vinod Chopra, who had seen an experimental film I had done – Let’s Talk, called me. He gave me a cheque for 2 lakh rupees saying he would like to block my dates for the next year. I humbly thanked him and returned the cheque. Six months later, he called me again for Munnabhai M.B.B.S, I turned down the offer. Few days later he again called me and insisted that I meet Raju Hirani. I was hesitant to meet him, but I still went. I was planning to finish that meeting in 20 minutes but I ended up spending 8 hours with Raju that day, and by the end of our meeting I said yes to play Dr. Asthana.”

The rest we all know is history. And while today Boman has a very successful career, the man hasn’t stopped dreaming. Recently he voiced his desire to direct a film someday. “I don’t want to keep anything unfulfilled in my life, so I will try it.”

Well, like he says — If there is passion in your heart and fire in your belly there is nothing that’s going to stop you, right Mr. Irani?

Image Credits: cochintalkies, magnamags, indiatvnews, talkingmoviez, parsikhabar

By Shweta Kulkarni

https://www.liveinstyle.com/signature-masterclass/boman-irani-inspiring-journey-waiter-actor-44

Anahita’s Law – a film by Oorvazi Irani

Excited to announce my next film
“Anahita’s Law”
Redefining the identity of women in the 21st century

Directed, Produced and Performed by Oorvazi Irani

Screenplay by Farrukh Dhondy

The short film is Releasing Online on Humaramovie on 3rd June 2019

Follow us for more updates on:
Facebook – www.facebook.com/anahitaslaw

Twitter: www.twitter.com/Oorvazi

Instagram: www.instagram.com/oorvaziirani

Pallavi Shroff makes it to Bollywood

Pallavi K. Shroff , our 24 year old pakki bawi with an unusual name has made her Bollywood debut in the field of special effects makeup in the Film Saand Ki Aankh . A cinematographer by qualification and a Prosthetics Artist by passion. She worked on a Kannada Film -Sakuchi and a Tamil Telugu Film – Game Over which are all yet to release. For the film Saand ki Aankh – She is the artist behind Taapsee Pannu’s look. First look is out- Releasing this Diwali.

Pallavi K Shroff

Mehr Jesia – Interview

Mehr Jesia,miss india,beauty pagaent

Mehr Jesia won the Femina Miss India 1986 and was part of the first generation of Indian supermodels

What’s the most Parsi thing about you?

My honesty.

What’s the most bizarre look you have tried in real life?

I think I was the first model in India to try all these bizarre hair extensions! I was so bad with the upkeep of it that every time I would walk, I’d leave a trail of hair behind me.

MEHR’S MINUTES

  • Date of birth: November 30
  • Sun Sign: Sagittarius
  • Place of birth: Kolkata
  • School/college: The J.B. Vachha High School / Sophia College For Women, Mumbai
  • First break: Lakme campaign
  • High point of your life: When I had my babies

Who’s your favourite Indian designer and why?

Apart from Rohit Khosla, it has to be Tarun (Tahiliani). He is like a brother to me and he has chosen me as his muse for the Blenders Pride Fashion Tour 2018.

The most vivid memory from the 1986 Miss India pageant where you won the title…?

There were five of us as finalists. The last common question was asked, and I see all these girls answering, but I hadn’t heard the question! I just heard whatever they were saying, processed it in my head and answered!

And what’s your most embarrassing moment on the runway?

When my zip split and I walked the entire show backwards!

MEHR’S FAVOURITES:

  • Movie:A Star Is Born (2018)
  • Comfort food: Parsi dhansak
  • Holiday destination: Any beach!
  • Sunday activity: Chilling at home with my kids
  • Supermodel of all time:Chrissy Teigen

If you have five minutes to get dressed for a party, what would you pick?

A black dress.

One thing you really miss about the modeling days in the ’80s and the early ’90s…?

The friendships among the girls.

One thing you have learned while bringing up your daughters, Mahikaa and Myra….?

To always have gratitude and patience, and to always keep the child inside you alive.

What’s your favourite holiday activity with your daughters…?

For them it is of course shopping, but for me it is just chilling on the beach or indulging in some kind of water sports with them.

https://www.hindustantimes.com/brunch/mehr-jesia-says-that-motherhood-has-taught-her-to-always-keep-the-child-inside-you-alive/story-ojLybDFNCnVEvU9cJAw07O.html

The Master Of Drawing Movement – Shiavax Chavda



Master draughtsman Shiavax Chavda, most well-known for drawing dancers, could always look to his wife, Bharatanatyam dancer Khurshid Vajifdar, for inspiration


Shiavax Chavda; his paintings (below)

The Nehru Centre Art Gallery, which has been regularly showcasing retrospectives of art masters for a quarter of a century, has chosen one of the pioneers of Indian modern art this month: late Mumbai artist and master draughtsman Shiavax Chavda.

The master of drawing movement

In 43 years of marriage, artist Shiavax Chavda and Bharatanatyam dancer Khurshid Vajifdar shared their life – their house and their office – as equals. In their circular workspace in Dhobi Talao, he took up one half as his studio, and she took up the other half to teach dance.

“He would hear a lot of tabla, harmonium and dance sounds: explanations, instructions, children asking questions,” says their daughter Jeroo Chavda. “It was a lively scene for him, because normally when you paint, it’s very solitary and quiet. You’re always by yourself. It added a lot of textures to his [paintings of] dancers. Even his abstracts, everybody says, ‘There’s so much movement in it.’ They’re not static.”

Drawing Movement

Chavda (1914-1990), an alumnus of Sir JJ School of Art and Slade School of Fine Art, London, had several phases in his four-decade-long career. From paintings of dancers to temple structures, portraits of tribal people to national leaders, from animals to abstracts, he pushed his art and research further and further into the unknown. “He always wanted to progress and evolve,” says Chavda. “He used to say, ‘If I’m stuck in a rut, I will never grow as an artist or as a person.’

Drawing Movement

His dancers were world-famous. I should not be talking as a daughter, but they used to say, ‘There is no parallel in the world. Nobody has been able to sketch and capture dancers in such precise form.’ Bharatanatyam looked like Bharatanatyam.”

The master of drawing movement

Although, he returned to abstract in the last 20 years of his life. “Because he had done enough portraits, figuratives, scenery, daily life, folk dancers, ballet dancers and Indian classical dancers. He was sent to Nagaland to sketch all the tribes, because they felt Indian missionaries were converting the tribes and they were losing their [way of life]. So, he had sketched everything humanly possible.

Drawing Movement

He kept saying, ‘I don’t want anyone to say this is my signature.’ Because there were a lot of artists who, you could just recognise them [their work], because of elongated limbs or a tiny head. He said, ‘If that’s the case, you might as well be a photocopying machine. So, how does it inspire me, or move me? My art has to satisfy me first before it goes into the public.'”

The master of drawing movement

At the Nehru Centre, in Worli, this month, a retrospective of his works will give “equal importance to the different phases,” says Chavda. “We have his nudes from London, drawings of temple sculptures, his horse races.” And, his dancers, of course, what with ready inspiration always at home. “My father was on the quieter side; my mother was the more bubbly and effusive one,” she says. “They were very balanced as a couple. Whenever dad did master sketches, he used to lay them out on the bed or the table, and ask us what we thought of it, what we saw in it. They fully respected each other and gave each other a lot of space because they always had this understanding.”

What: Indian Masters’ Retrospective Exhibition: Artist Shiavax Chavda
When: December 21 to January 6
Where: Nehru Centre Art Gallery, Dr Annie Besant Rd, Worli

https://www.mid-day.com/articles/the-master-of-drawing-movement/20107168

NCPA Scholarships for Young Musicians 2019-20

Applications (bio-data on music education) are invited from students for a scholarship in advance training in Hindustani Music (vocal-khyal / dhrupad, percussion – tabla / pakhawal). The value of the scholarship is Rs. 7,500/- per month for one year (April 2019 to March 2020). Send in your application (bio-data on music education) via mail to ncpascholarships@gmail.com or in an envelope marked ‘City – NCPA Scholarship for Young Musicians 2019-20 (Hindustani Music)’ to the National Centre for the Performing Arts, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400021 on or before 31st Dec, 2018. Please note, application received after 31st Dec 2018 will not be accepted.

The application must contain details regarding the individual’s name, date of birth, address, contact number/alternate contact number ,professional qualification, email ID, music teacher/gurus, number of year of total training and details of achievements / prizes /scholarships and performances, amongst other net worthy details. The shortlisted candidates will be informed via email or telephone. They will be required to appear for an audition at the NCPA, Mumbai, in the month of February 2017. The decision of the NCPA Selection Committee will be final.

Contact No: 022-66223872/3737 (Mon to Fri. 10:30 am to 5:30 pm)

Eligibility Criteria & General Instructions:

  • Age Limit-

               For Khayal/Tabla/Pakhwaj – 18 to 30 years of age (as off 1st March 2019)

             For Dhrupad – 18 to 35 years of age (as off 1st March 2019)

  • Students who are beneficiaries of other scholarship/grant in the field of music during April 2019-20, are not eligible to apply.
  • Professional musicians including those with ‘A’ grade from All India Radio are not eligible to apply.
  • Only Indian citizens are eligible to apply. 

Click Here for more – https://www.ncpamumbai.com/event/scholarship-for-young-musicians-2019-20-hindustani-music#

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