Category Archives: Galleries

Mission Safeer wins Best Documentary-Jury Award and this historic evacuation features in The Limca Book Of Records 2019


We are proud to announce that our Documentary
” Mission Safeer ..Thirty seven Days to Freedom”has won the prestigious Best Documentary-Jury Award at the 6th International Film Festival at Noida 
Attached are the pictures of the award
We would like more people to view our documentary 
and share it with others and give comments 


https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/evacuation-of-722-indians-on-a-cargo-ship-enters-limca-records/articleshow/68420012.cms


Thank you!

Capt. Viraf Kekobad

Webinar to be hosted by Liz Bapasola – 21st March 2019


Hello,

I’m the daughter-in-law of Khursheed and Noshir Bapasola, Sam Bapasola’s wife, and a member of ZAPANJ. I’m the Founder, CEO, and Gallup Certified Strengths Coach for my new company, Liz Bapasola & Associates, LLC. It’s an executive and life coaching/consulting company, formally founded last October.

I would like to share this exciting and FREE webinar, occurring on Thursday, March 21st at 12pm, held online. It’s a webinar to celebrate the Persian New Year and coach participants on how to “Be Better Than Before.”

More details are here: www.lizbapasola.com/liz-bapasolas-events

Thank you for your consideration and support! I really appreciate it.

Best,

Liz

Let’s share “The Secret Of Holy Fire” with Humanity


From: Meher Amalsad, Westminster, California, USALet’s Create An Inner Desire, To Honor Our Sacred Fire
Banameh Ahura Mazda

My Dear Zartoshti Brothers and Sisters:
Our mission is to promote our core essence ofGood Thoughts, Good Words and Good Deeds with Humanity.
With this sense of our Zarathushti pride…
Let’s begin by watching this 5-minute heart warming clip on 

“The Secret of Holy Fire, Azar Goshnasp” 

This is a very ancient fire which is believed to be still alive by many in Azerbaijan – Iran .

This documentary endeavors to showcase this rare fortune to everyone who likes to know more about this Holy Fire, The great Pars, The power of mesmerizing Sassanid Kings and about our glorious Persian History in the past 2,500 years.

To date, Mona Sedaghat, the producer, funded $69,700 USD 

for this documentary from her own personal funds.

The production of this documentary movie started in May 2018.

She has been working diligently with a well known History Professor of UCI, Dr. Touraj Daryaee and Mobed Zarrir Bhandara, the head priest of Zoroastrian Association Of California.

While the movie is at its completion stage, Mona has ran short of funds.

She is in urgent need of financial assistance from those who would like to become a part of this fabulous journey.

She also needs help to promote this movie by showcasing it at various Universities, museums, galleries, festivals as well as on prominent TV Channels across the globe.

The funds needed to complete this movie is $14,000 USD.

To date she has invested about $69,700 USD from her own personal resources.

If you would like to be a partial or full sponsor for this laudable project please contact:

Company’s name: Arina Enterprises

Mona Sedaghat/ Producer/President

Cell: 1- 949 573 4409

Email: arinaenterprisemedia@gmail.com

Thank you for your help towards the completion of this benevolent project which we believe will highlight the grandeur of our Zarthosti religion, history and culture.

The goal is to raise these funds before 

NouRouz, March 21, 2019.

We plan to debut this documentary on our 

Asho Zartosht’s Birthday

March 26, 2019.

All Donors and Sponsors Will Be Recognized in this Documentary.

Thank you for your valuable support for this laudable project.

With love, light, appreciation and gratitude from

Meher Amalsad

Let’s Create An Inner Desire, To Support Our Sacred Fire

The Master Of Drawing Movement – Shiavax Chavda




Master draughtsman Shiavax Chavda, most well-known for drawing dancers, could always look to his wife, Bharatanatyam dancer Khurshid Vajifdar, for inspiration


Shiavax Chavda; his paintings (below)

The Nehru Centre Art Gallery, which has been regularly showcasing retrospectives of art masters for a quarter of a century, has chosen one of the pioneers of Indian modern art this month: late Mumbai artist and master draughtsman Shiavax Chavda.

The master of drawing movement

In 43 years of marriage, artist Shiavax Chavda and Bharatanatyam dancer Khurshid Vajifdar shared their life – their house and their office – as equals. In their circular workspace in Dhobi Talao, he took up one half as his studio, and she took up the other half to teach dance.

“He would hear a lot of tabla, harmonium and dance sounds: explanations, instructions, children asking questions,” says their daughter Jeroo Chavda. “It was a lively scene for him, because normally when you paint, it’s very solitary and quiet. You’re always by yourself. It added a lot of textures to his [paintings of] dancers. Even his abstracts, everybody says, ‘There’s so much movement in it.’ They’re not static.”

Drawing Movement

Chavda (1914-1990), an alumnus of Sir JJ School of Art and Slade School of Fine Art, London, had several phases in his four-decade-long career. From paintings of dancers to temple structures, portraits of tribal people to national leaders, from animals to abstracts, he pushed his art and research further and further into the unknown. “He always wanted to progress and evolve,” says Chavda. “He used to say, ‘If I’m stuck in a rut, I will never grow as an artist or as a person.’

Drawing Movement

His dancers were world-famous. I should not be talking as a daughter, but they used to say, ‘There is no parallel in the world. Nobody has been able to sketch and capture dancers in such precise form.’ Bharatanatyam looked like Bharatanatyam.”

The master of drawing movement

Although, he returned to abstract in the last 20 years of his life. “Because he had done enough portraits, figuratives, scenery, daily life, folk dancers, ballet dancers and Indian classical dancers. He was sent to Nagaland to sketch all the tribes, because they felt Indian missionaries were converting the tribes and they were losing their [way of life]. So, he had sketched everything humanly possible.

Drawing Movement

He kept saying, ‘I don’t want anyone to say this is my signature.’ Because there were a lot of artists who, you could just recognise them [their work], because of elongated limbs or a tiny head. He said, ‘If that’s the case, you might as well be a photocopying machine. So, how does it inspire me, or move me? My art has to satisfy me first before it goes into the public.'”

The master of drawing movement

At the Nehru Centre, in Worli, this month, a retrospective of his works will give “equal importance to the different phases,” says Chavda. “We have his nudes from London, drawings of temple sculptures, his horse races.” And, his dancers, of course, what with ready inspiration always at home. “My father was on the quieter side; my mother was the more bubbly and effusive one,” she says. “They were very balanced as a couple. Whenever dad did master sketches, he used to lay them out on the bed or the table, and ask us what we thought of it, what we saw in it. They fully respected each other and gave each other a lot of space because they always had this understanding.”

What: Indian Masters’ Retrospective Exhibition: Artist Shiavax Chavda
When: December 21 to January 6
Where: Nehru Centre Art Gallery, Dr Annie Besant Rd, Worli

https://www.mid-day.com/articles/the-master-of-drawing-movement/20107168

Homai Vyarawalla and her iconic pics


Little did everyone know that a young and zealous Parsi girl would go on to become India’s first female photojournalist, and perhaps even the best one till this day.

Homai Vyarawalla was born on 9 December 1913 in Gujarat. She moved to Mumbai, then Bombay, to pursue a diploma at St Xavier’s college, after which she joined the J J Schools of Arts, where she, luckily for all of us, picked up a camera and began to study photography.

Homai with her wooden  Speed Graphic Pacemaker camera
Homai with her wooden Speed Graphic Pacemaker camera

It was at J J school that she met Manekshaw Vyarawalla, a freelance photographer who introduced her to the art form. She would later go on to marry him.

Her first assignment at college, to photograph a picnic, was published by Bombay Chronicle, a local newspaper, after which she regularly picked up more freelance assignments, including work for The Illustrated Weekly Magazine of India.

Click Here for the full story and some amazing pics – https://www.thequint.com/photos/iconic-images-homai-vyarawalla-india-first-woman-photojournalist

Indira Gandhi with Rajiv and Sanjay at the first Asian Games at the National Stadium. Delhi, 1951
(Photo courtesy: HV Archive/ The Alkazi Collection of Photography)

https://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/13156794/

https://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/1771427/

https://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/11179592/

‘A Parsi delight’ is a sparkling treasury on Parsi life



Tanuja Relia and Anil Relia in front of the Portrait of shipbuilder Jehangir Nowrojee with steamboat agent Oliver Miller White

Anil Relia once again opens his treasure chest to give us a sparkling collection of Parsi portraits in the ninth edition of his eponymous Indian Portrait series. The vast personal collection includes portrait paintings, photographs, prints and collectible of the Parsi community ranging from early 16th century to late 20th century. The show opened at Amdavad ni Gufa on December 4, 2018 and will remain on display until December 9, 2018.

Ninth in the series, ‘The Indian Portrait IX – A Parsi Delight’ is a collection of rare portraits from the personal collection of art collector, entrepreneur and preserver Anil Relia and his wife Tanuja Relia. The atmosphere of inauguration was amplified by the presence of eminent citizens from Parsi community who turned out at the event in their traditional attire. The exhibition opened on the evening of December 4, 2018, at Amdavad Ni Gufa in Ahmedabad.

The Indian Portrait series by Relia bears a legacy status now. The way it culminates documentary evidence and aesthetic evolution of portraiture in different regions of India over centuries, makes it a rare collection of topnotch curator-ship. In it’s early editions Relia has showcased portraits themed under subjects like Rajputana Nayak, Colonial influence on Raja Ravi Varma and his contemporaries and Mughal Empire among others. The founder of Archer Art Gallery this time takes its audience on a fascinating voyage to the Parsi culture by assembling 170 aesthetically rich paintings and collectibles from his collection. Relia, who has formerly curated shows according to era and styles has come up with an art exhibition that is specially dedicated to a community for the first time.

Click Here for more – https://creativeyatra.com/news/anil-relias-parsi-delight-sparkling-treasury-parsi-life/

Mission Safeer-Thirty Seven Days to Freedom


The documentary “Mission Safeer-Thirty Seven Days to Freedom” is the a true story of cargo ship Motor Vessel Safeer. (M. V. Safeer)
To its misfortune, Safeer docked in Kuwait and was unloading its cargo of rice, when Saddam Hussein, the then president of Iraq, declared war on Kuwait.
Though Safeer was registered in Panama, its owners and 26 crew members, were Indians. One of the owners was Capt Viraf R Kekobad.
Saddam declared, that all Indians were free to leave Kuwait,
as India had good relations with Iraq that time.
It was a mammoth task for the Indian government to get over 176,000 Indian expatriates out of a country, that had just been attacked.
Some left the country by crossing borders, some were airlifted by Air India planes and 722 Indians by ship,the only ship that was allowed to leave Kuwait, the M. V Safeer.
This 45 minute documentary is the story of the refugees,the crew, the owners and the Indian government who made this journey to freedom- possible.
It is also the story of heroism and teamwork.
Do watch this documentary on YouTube:

THE DOCUMENTARY A true story of heroism by the ship’s crew who faced tremendous odds in face of adversity and eventually managed to sail out of war torn region of Kuwait, with 722 Indians expatriates which included 265 women …

Related article https://zoroastrians.net/2018/03/08/captain-viraf-kekobad/

Thirty-seven days to freedom – Frontline

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